Everything You Wanted To Know About Blessing, But Were Afraid To Ask*

20170428 BLESSING 0 BLESSING‘Bless you’, I said.  ‘But, I haven’t sneezed’, was their reply.

And so, for some, that’s the limit of their understanding of when a blessing is initiated, or perhaps an indication of their level of their uncomfortableness or embarrassment at being blessed.

Have you ever been asked to bless? As a Druid, Celtic, Christian, Pagan, or, of another faith or belief, have you ever been asked, or bypassed the request, or felt uneasy about it?

It may feel odd to receive a blessing in daily life; it may seem strange to  bless or want to bless another person. But, blessings are great events full of meaning, power, pathos and convey favour, love, understanding, acceptance, promise and, well…a blessing!

And yet, we are reluctant to bless, aren’t we?

‘When you wish someone joy, you wish them peace, love, prosperity, happiness… all the good things.’  Maya Angelou

It is such a simple thing to utter those words, and yet we refrain, perhaps thinking it too easy. At other times, we be reluctant because we think it too complicated or disqualify ourselves, deferring to others – thinking, ‘They have a qualification, a title, and office, and so they are best placed to bless others’. Too simple.  And, we miss out blessing others, and miss out on being blessed. We seem to place obstacles in our path, close the door, and find reasons not to bless.

Perhaps there’s a middle route?

‘See, I have placed before you an open door that no one can shut.’ Rev 3:8b, The Book

Who can bless? This is an easy one to answer. You can! We identify ourselves in so many ways, and usually materially, but then we live in a very materialistic world. We might identify ourselves by the work we do, our familial status, age, our social status or, perhaps, our income. Very seldom do we say, I am myself. I am spirit. I am soul. There is a holiness in me. Therefore, I am someone who can bless’. [Excerpt from David Spangler’s book, ‘Blessing: The Art And The Practice’]

I really do believe we live in a time when there is a great need to bless people, local and world events, etc eco-nature concerns, events, workplaces, homes, projects and endeavours etc. It’s time to ‘send out’ those blessings, and in return to realise we, too, are blessed. Whether we are Druid, Celtic, Christian, Pagan, of another faith or belief, I do believe (more) blessing is needed at such a time as this, and so all of the articles on TadhgTalks next week will be on blessing in one way or another. I’m excited about that, and would encourage the same in you. You are called! Needed! And, have that capability and energy, and will be blessed, too.

‘The most important matter for a practitioner is to be able to break through the veil of the material plane in order to enter the ultimate dimension and see the interconnection between us and all other phenomena in the world around us.’ Thich Nhat Hanh,

It is so important that we know the value of blessing, how to bless in formal ways and informal ways, to bless and be blessed in the process. It is not just a duty and a joyful one at that, it’s more. It’s your birth-right and a calling from another realm.

‘Behind your image, below your words, above your thoughts, the silence of another world waits. John O’Donohue

Next week, we’ll consider exactly what a blessing is, the source of it/them, the ‘how to’ (using the Caim, imaginal ‘tools’ etc), the reasons for blessing, and the reciprocal nature of blessing-energy. Yes, you can benefit, too.

 

* Well, perhaps not everything.

 

Celtic Thought: Beltane Fire, Reflections.

20170427 BELTANE FIRE REFLECTIONS CELTIC THOUGHTBeltane (1 May) is almost here, that time of celebration as we usher in a new season: summer.

For many it probably doesn’t feel like summer, or even spring at the moment – it’s about the temperature of the inside of a fridge in London at the moment as temperatures have plummeted over the last few days. But, summer is on its way.

Beltane, then, marks the entry-point to summer, and summer (as with the southern compass point) is associated with fire. So, here some words on the seasonally-apt theme of fire.

‘Fire is the most tolerable third party.’ ‘Henry David Thoreau

Beltane, along with rituals of old to protect cattle, crops and people, was also a time of celebration involving a community bonfire. Think of Druids of old around a bonfire, ancient and latter-day Celts, or St Patrick and other Christians celebrating the coming of Light. Bonfires have long been associated with this time – though there is no reason why you can’t celebrate the event in a special way, if at home on that evening, with the lighting of a symbolic candle.

But, it’s a time of fire.

‘Beltane is a wonderful time for expressing who you truly are.’ Carole Carlton

There is an intimacy about fire. Figuratively, we might describe a couple deeply in love as burning with passion, with fire in their hearts for each other. For those burning with ambition (pun intended), we might describe them as having fire in their belly.

‘Desire is a bonfire that burns with greater fury, asking for more fuel… ‘ Sri Sathya Sai Baba

Fire is alive.

At school, albeit many, many years ago, I well remember learning about the seven processes that underpin all life.

Firstly, living things move to find food, and fire moves especially rapidly during forest fires, house fires to find and consume material for fuel.

Living things undergo respiration – they need oxygen. Fire ‘breathes in’ oxygen, and needs it to sustain its energy. Starve a fire of oxygen and it dies.

Exodus 19:18 ‘Now Mount Sinai was wrapped in smoke because the Lord had descended on it in fire…’ Exodus 19.18a, The Book

Sensitivity is another process of life as it detects changes in its surroundings. Fire also is sensitive to its surroundings, as it responds to the materials it encounters, favouring some and moving away from others eg wood and water, paper and metal etc).

Fire, like living cells, grows. The more fuel fire finds, the larger and more expansive the flames.

That naturally bring us onto nutrition. Living cells, animals, trees, plants etc need food to live, and fire is no different. Take away its fuel source and it dies.

Reproduction? Yes, just as life reproduces itself, so does fire. In many rituals one candle is initially lit, and from that many others are lit (with the former being diminished in any way). Fire can make umpteen copies of itself – forming ‘offspring’ of its own kind.

I smoor the hearth
as Mary smoors it.
The vigilance of Brighid and Mary
be upon the fire and upon the floor
and over the whole household.

{Celtic prayer)

And finally, something that is not spoken of in polite company is excretion.  Living things excrete. Explore a landscape after a fire, look into a hearth when a fire has died, or has been smoored, and ash is the result. Ash, the excretion left behind by the fire.

Fire is alive.

Fire is intimate. If you’re fortunate enough to have an open fire, a hearth in the living room, a wonderful and deep meditation is to just sit and gaze at it for an hour without artificial light.  As a child, and even today, I meditate in such a way whenever I can. I heartily recommend it. The fire draws you in. It invites you to cosy up, relax, douse all other thoughts and to look deeply into it. And then, a myriad of ‘liquid’ fire shapes erupt, dance about, grow, are diminished and then disappear, only to be replaced by other fantastical, yellow, orange and red ‘ignitic beings’ who dance in their place. Shapes appear, heat is felt, thoughts amble and time is ‘consumed’ in a pleasant and wonderful way. And then one looks around. The rest of the room looks darker, cooler if not colder and altogether different. It’s then, and only after the event, that you realise that such a deep mediation took you into that liminal realm, that altogether-other place, sacred space, and what some would call a ‘thin place, a caol áit (pronounced ‘kweel awtch’).

Communion. Connectedness. Caol áit. Candle?

Beltane is a time of the new season of summer, whose element is fire, and it is a time to celebrate in large ways and small, to light a bonfire or candle, but a time to draw aside, consider the intimacy of the fire-season and celebrate – to mark the occasion is some joyful, positive, pleasant and memorable way. Do something special this Beltane.

‘We are all born with a divine fire in us. Our efforts should be to give wings to this fire and fill the world with the glow of its goodness.’ Abdul Kalam

Tadhg’s Journal: ‘The End Of The World’ Or ‘And I Will Walk 500 Miles…’

20170426 CAMINO TADHGS JOURNALI’ve been pondering what to do. There’s a few things I need to do, somethings that I’d like to do, but one of my plans is, for later this year perhaps, one thing that I’d really like to commit to, is…

…to walk the Camino de Santiago. A pilgrimage.

Over the last couple of years the idea has been ‘bouncing around’ in my mind, and I’ve read umpteen books on it and read the journals of those who have walked it, seen a few videos about it, and even studied one of the few journey-planner books that ‘concertina out’ to show you the route, variations, places of interest on the map, and locations of pensiones (basic hostels for sleeping and for breakfasting along the way, which sounds really ‘rough’) and alternative accommodation (which sound much more ‘me’ and much more appealing).

‘Walking the Camino de Santiago taught me the wonders of physical challenge, the wonders of spiritual freedom, and the wonders of baby powder.’ Christy Hall

The Route: One of the most popular, and the one that appeals to me the most is the route that leads from St Jean-Pied-de-Pont near Biarritz, in the south-western corner of France, along the northern part of Spain to Santiago. Some would say it is traditionally Christian county, and Celtic and Druid land, Basque areas and more, and I dare say all of those and others have walked (and still walk) the Camino because it transcends mere nationality.

It takes about 30-33 days to complete as it’s  800km long, that’s 500 miles (hence the song title in this articles heading, words from that great (umm, well ‘well-known’) Scottish duo, The Proclaimers.

However, glutton for punishment that I am, I’d really like to travel further, at least for another 2-3 days, and arrive at the coast, at a place called Finnisterre, literally, ‘the end of the world’. So-called, because the Romans, from yesteryear, saw it as the end of their empire, the end of their world.

Why do it? I was going to say, ‘because it’s there’, and that’s part of the appeal. The other reasons are that it has a long history. It’s the journey that is really important, and not the destination. It  is deeply spiritual. Pilgrims have been walking that route for over a millennia and I’d like to be added to that number, and it’s a route that is full of pathos,  meaning and history and wonderful myth (and that’s something for another time); and usually, there are two main reasons for doing it.

‘A beginner’s mind and a backpack is all you need.’

When you arrive at the end of that pilgrimage, you take the paperwork (a sheet that has been ‘stamped’ at major points along the way) to the Pilgrim’s Office desk. They issue a certificate of completion. There are two types of certificate: one is in Latin, and is issued to pilgrims who declare that they did the Camino for religious or spiritual purposes. Your name will also be written in Latin. That’s the certificate I’ll walk for, and I’m eager to see how they ‘Latinise’ my name, Tadhg. The second certificate is for those who did it for cultural or historical purposes. This one is written in Spanish.

It’s usual, when it comes to declaring the walk for spiritual reasons  for some to dedicate the walk in memory of a loved-one, and that’s what I’ll do – in memory of my dear late Dad and Mum.

‘Connect with others, nature, and yourself. Throughout the Camino de Santiago, it is tradition to greet anyone you meet with a “Buen Camino.” Everyone becomes a part of your expedition, a part of your story…’

There is a great movie/DVD called ‘The Way’. It stars Martin Sheen as a doctor, Tom, who receives an urgent call from the French police regarding his son, who….well, that would be telling. It’s a great DCD, a good storyline and shows off some of the scenery and meaning of walking the Camino de Santiago, The Way Of St James. Here’s a trailer.

Well, this is my intention. My aim is to do it later this year. I would value your prayers, energy, positivity, and well-wishes for this event, as I want to make it special, and also want to ‘take you with me’, metaphorically, as I’d like to report about the journey on a daily basis as it happens. But, it’s not for a while yet. It’s an aim. And, so back to more Camino research, studying and planning for me.

‘Wanderer, your footsteps are the road, and nothing more; wanderer, there is no road, the road is made by walking’. Antonio Machado

But, please start sending that much-needed energy. Regards, Tadhg.

Cosmic Fire [Within]: A Poem & Liturgy For Beltane.

20170425 COSMIC FIRE WITHIN POEMBeltane, celebrated on 1 May, is fast approaching.

The wheel turns, as the Earth continues to circle the sun. As it turns, and east is represented by the element of the wind (and we’re moving away from that), then due south is represented by fire, and we’re moving toward that.

Due south, the time of the summer solstice is the height of that season and element, so Beltane is south-east. Not quite east, not quite south. It’s a ‘moving into’ time’, as we move south-ward. In Wales and Ireland, and other Celtic countries Beltane is the beginning of summer, or at least the summer season represented by fire (even if, weather-wise, it doesn’t quite feel that way), and so many – perhaps yourself – will light candles and bonfires to welcome the wonderful event of Beltane, and usher in a new season.

Beltane is the time for dancing around maypoles (a popular event at primary school, but maybe not so now). It is the season of maturing life and deep found love, and the time of making vows, handfastings and other commitments. In Wales, Beltane is also known as Calan Mai. I’m afraid those words, themselves, don’t have a deep meaning, and they just mean the first day of May. However, the event itself is very significant and is a wonderful time of celebration.

My encouragement to you, then, is the celebrate the event in large ways or small, but to celebrate it is some significant way (that is unique to you).

With Beltane and fire in mind, here’s a poem, a Beltane liturgy that may be of use. It will form part of my Beltane celebrations.

Cosmic Fire [Within]

Before time itself,
when matter was but a dream in the Divine mind,
in the cosmic explosive crucible
of the furthest reaches of space,
fire roared.

Before life was formed,
when cosmic radiation coalesced
into a myriad of starry forms,
as the universe expanded,
fire grew.

Before humanity arose,
when the universe was oh-so-young and innocent,
the Source of All
planned that you should be here, and
fire moved.

Before this present time,
before you even knew that you are ‘you’,
energy was planted in all the elements.
Visible only to those who have eyes to see.
Fire hid.

From the very start,
it was ordained, that one place for the element of fire
to reside, to enliven and to empower,
was deep in the very core of humanity’s being, in your
heart.

Praise be to you Brother Sun, Sister fire.
Visible and invisible are you.
Felt and yet unknown.
Through you we can shine like a myriad stars in the sky.
A return to the beginning.

 

Celtic Thought: Are We There Yet? [Connectedness In A ‘Disconnected’ World]

20170424 ARE WE THERE YET CELTIC THOUGHTI’m sure you asked the same or similar question when you were a child. Maybe, like me, you were in the back of the car, drifting in and out of sleep, journeying back home, and during those waking moments you would ask nearest adult, probably several times, the question, ‘Are we there, yet?’.

Now, as an adult we might rephrase that question, and apply it to other instances, but essentially we often ask that same type of question, whether it applies to a physical journey, a task in hand, repayments left on the mortgage, our place in the universe or in relationship to the Source.

And, where it matters most, say, in relationship to those cosmic, huge questions, those last two questions mentioned above, the answer could be…is, an outstanding, ‘yes!’. Surprised?

There is a school of thought that says we’re on Earth, and space starts a few miles above us. Point a telescope upward and you’ll see stars.

I asked a child family-member, ‘Would you like to go into space?’ They, ofcourse replied with a resounding, ‘Yes’. And, I replied, ‘Well, you already are!’. Naturally, they were a bit disappointed, having a childish understanding of what I was on about and really hoped that somehow they could be ‘catapulted’ above the Earth’s atmosphere – but, as regards their understanding, it’s okay, because they are a child!

‘Astronomy compels the soul to look upward, and leads us from this world to another.’ Plato, The Republic

As you probably know I’m an amateur astronomer, and the proud owner of a 12 inch telescope. Point it 180 degrees to the east at night and you would see a myriad of stars, Point it in the opposite direction and you’ll see just as many stars. Stars to the left, to the right, stars above and below. Yes, we are in space. Not separate, not different, but in space in one glorious feat of connectedness. Part of the universe, already. It’s just that some don’t think that. It’s true, but they don’t get it! Ego confuses the issue. But, in essence if we asked the question, ‘Are we there, yet?’ ‘Ofcourse we are!’, is the reply.

‘The wonder is, not that the field of stars of so vast, but that man has measured it.’ Anatole France

We’re included, not excluded.

There is a theological view that we’re separate from the Source of All. And, if we like those renaissance paintings where God is depicted as above and maybe sitting on a cloud, and humanity is below, then we can be forgiven for thinking that we’re separate. God up there, us down here. However, one commentator whom I shall call ‘The One Who Knows’ prayed a prayer to the Source along the lines of,  ‘That they may be one, even as we are one’. Taking that at face value, then we’re already one, already connected. Yes, we’re already there and always have been, essentially. It’s just that, existentially, some don’t know it. Ego confuses the issue.

‘For in him we live and move and have our being…’ Acts 17.28, The book (part)

We’re included, not excluded.

Ofcourse, the same could be said of people (that we’re essentially separated from others), or nature (that we’re somehow so different as to be separate from it), and so on. Is it so, or do we just think that? Included and part? Or Excluded and separate?

And, if we believe  we’re separate (even when we’re not) it could mean, and I would suggest it does mean, that we’re mistaken to the point that we’re are not (fully) exercising the Source-given responsibility, and not utilising loving-energy toward each other and nature around us, in what we think and say and do, that we should be exercising. Egoic limitations then abound.

‘Unless one’s philosophy is all-inclusive, nothing can be understood.’ Mary Ritter Beard

But, what do you think?

Celtic Thought: Seeing In The Dark

20170419 CELTIC THOUGHT SEEING IN THE DARKFor many, light equals safety. And for them, darkness infers insecurity and may lead to feelings of fear. It is the case that, sometimes, we talk about light in a positive way, darkness in a negative way, but it need not always be the case.

True, when we ‘shine a light’ on something, metaphorically, we can come to see it, picture it, and understand it, and perhaps even quantify it. This may be an advantage when speaking of physical things. What then of spiritual things, and when we need to use a different form of perception? If we’re talking about the deep things of the Source, then ‘seeing’ can be a handicap. Think of the Source, and whatever ‘picture’ or metaphor we use by way of a description  will be limiting and therefore inaccurate. The Source is beyond our imagining, and cannot be quantified.

So, a different form of perception is needed. We need: seeing in the dark. And that means, befriending the dark.

‘I said to my soul, be still, and let darkness come upon you
which shall be the darkness of God.’ T S Eliot

I admit, when I’m in north Wales, I love night walks in the forest. These can be deeply spiritual and rewarding. My eyes are rendered virtually useless as I navigate my way in near total darkness, and yet other ways of perceiving arise. I become more attuned to the sounds of animals, the ‘sighing’ of the trees as the wind blows through them, the sound of a nearby rivulet, the smells of trees and flowers, the feeling of the earth underfoot, and deep feelings of ‘presences’. I love it. I’m safe but lost (in wonder). Alone (but surrounded by nature). Wrong-footed visually (but something deep inside comes to the fore to guide me). Isn’t that encounter? Connectedness? We need a different way of seeing and that starts with befriending the dark.

Why?

Because the Source ‘inhabits’ the dark, too. And, in that darkness we are not distracted to see the Source as this thing or that. The Source, in the dark, is invisible, close, true and (almost) palpable. More so, in the dark.

[The Source]…’parted the heavens and came down, [and]
dark clouds were under his feet’ Psalm 18:9, The Book

With no visual distractions, with darkness all around, we rely on that which is deep within. In the dark there is no false illusion, no eyesight-vision at all, no distractions, no opportunity to quantify. Deep calls to deep. An encounter with the Source, as a result of deep meditation, cannot be described in terms of length and breadth, cannot be quantified, but merely spoken of in near-miss metaphors at best,  with the use of clumsy words. But, with our eyes closed in meditation or prayer, we enter the dark[ness]. And encounter in a deep, dynamic, earth-transcending, indescribable, real way.

‘You will…be led upwards to the Ray of the divine Darkness which exceeds all existence.’ Dionysius, Mystical Theology.

It sounds paradoxical: the way to the Source is not to use your eyes; if you want to ‘see’, then look into the dark; the Source is such a great Light that the Source uses darkness to make us comfortable; darkness releases us from the handicap of visual-quantification; in the dark we ‘see’ more.

‘There is in God (some say) a deep, but dazzling darkness.’ Henry Vaughn, The Night.

Do not fear. Make friends with the dark.

 

Celtic Thought: Deep Calls To Deep In An Age Of Shallow

20170418 DEEP CALLS TO DEEP CELTIC THOUGHTIs it just me, or has the world moved into the ‘shallow end’ of the swimming pool, metaphorically? And, if it’s always been this way, perhaps more so nowadays? I’m used to politicians alarmingly giving glib and shallow answers (and doubly alarming when the public or journalists swallow wholesale what they say without question), but it seems to me that in other  spheres of life there’s been a movement to quick and shallow, rather than slow and deep.

I hear your voice on the wind
And I hear you call out my name.

Could it be that, though the mass media, we’re conditioned to accept the quick answer, the frivolous and not wait and ponder? In many cases we’re so caught up in the moment, the noise, the neon glare of the city, that we miss that still, small voice. Richard Rohr quotes a psychological phenomenon that states if we don’t ‘anchor’ a new experience and encounter as something unique, then within fifteen seconds it will be stored in the brain as a run-of-the-mill event and hardly remembered. Dwell with mystery.

Be not afraid, come follow me
Answer my call, and I’ll set you free”

Why is it that we so easily pleased? To ‘dive deep’ demands that we slow down, really allow information and experience to ‘sink in’, but that way of working is alien to the world we live in. And yet, for those who do take time, the rewards are out of this world.

Why are we so content to swim in the shallows? For some, it’s fear. Many shun solitude and quietness, run from experiential knowledge or body wisdom, because they feel they will be out of their depth. Actually, that’s true. But, it’s when we’re out of our depth that we experience the guiding on the Unseen One, who is more than capable to buoy us up.

Why are we so busy? Many have the mistaken notion that ‘a full diary, makes for a happy life’. True, many people have jobs that demand that we’re time-conscious, but sometimes, maybe many times, that way of working spills over into our recreation time. Remember: you don’t have to answer your mobile phone immediately it rings.

And then, often, we miss out on dolce far niente – my favourite Italian phrase which means ‘sweetly, doing nothing’. Try it!

I am the voice of the future, bring me your peace
Bring me your peace, and my wounds, they will heal

Why are we so fearful? Our society encourages us to be in control at all times. Why would anyone dive into the deep end, and risk being caught up in currents that take one to unknown places? And, yet if we don’t we well miss out. Surrender.

To put ourselves in the way of the Source, to encounter the Source by slowing down and listening intently, and responding deeply is a risk, but it’s worth it.

It’s like diving or swimming in the ocean. Immense. Frightening. Powerful. And yet, amazingly refreshing, beautiful and rewarding. Then, deep calls to deep. In that liminal space,  answers don’t come easily, and pain is exposed rather than covered over, but it is where healing and transformation takes place. It is dealing with the real wound, rather than just applying a zeitgeist ‘band-aid’.

We live in a time where it is easy to avoid those tough questions, to ignore our own foibles, to fill our days with busy-ness and sometimes meaningless activity, to turn on the tv etc. But, deep calls to deep, and yet often we resist and we long to stay at the shallow end.

I am the voice that always is calling you
I am the voice

Take for example, ritual. Any ritual can be done glibly. The words can be recited, actions done automatically and quickly, and before we know it we’re saying ‘amen’, ‘so be it’, ‘so mote it be’, or awen, or similar.

But, the take time, to slow it down, to ponder upon each phrase and to use intuition and imagination to take ourselves into that ‘magical’ and powerful place of liminality, and we can encounter the Source, The Voice, The Friend. Deep calls to deep, and we benefit when we respond in kind. It is one of the reasons that I (as a latter-day Celt, Druidic Christian etc) cherish, love, and waste no time in finding ways to celebrate events and the seasons in liturgy and ritual. Ritual opens the door to another place of power, purpose and potential, it ushers us into a ‘thin place’, and we benefit in so many different ways. Have you experienced a ‘thin place’, liminality?

Ne’er do I sleep throughout all the cold winter long
I am the force that in springtime will grow

Right now, the voice of the Source continues to speak deeply to each one of us. I do believe the Source never stops providing us with opportunities to encounter, and ritual is one way in which the Source reminds us to draw near, or dive deep, to ‘lose ourselves’ in that Great Ocean of Encounter.

Over the next few weeks I’ll be writing more about how we can grow and be transformed, can move into that liminal realm of encounter, and benefit – infact, some have asked for day workshops on this very theme, and so, it’s very much as case of ‘watch this space’.

Meanwhile, my encouragement to myself and to you is to go deeper in the things that make for Encounter. Deep really does call to deep. Respond in kind.

Blessings, Tadhg.

 

Quotes above from the song, ‘The Voice’, by Celtic Woman

 

Celtic Thought: Wisdom In 200 Words Or Less

20170417 WISDOM IN 200 WORDS OR LESS CELTIC THOUGHTWe  live in a world bristling with knowledge of all kinds. Mankind has stood on the moon, has split the atom, and may have discovered life-enabling properties on Enceladus (one of the moons of Saturn).  I’m told humankind has ‘discovered’ more knowledge of the universe in the last 30 years than the previous 30,000 years. I can well imagine that. And yet, there is an urgent need for wisdom.

We can do amazing things, and yet old seemingly intractable ‘challenges’ continue.

Where does wisdom come from, how is it nurtured, can it reside within humanity? It’s just a thought for today….

‘Wisdom brings up her own children and cares for those who seek her.’ Wisdom of Sirach 4:11. The Book

Are you a knowledge-seeker? A wisdom-seeker? Are they mutually exclusive? And if not, what takes precedence? If knowledge is information, perhaps wisdom is in how to use it?Just a few thoughts? What do you think?

Christian, Celt, Druid, of another faith or none, maybe what we really need is wisdom? ‘Get wisdom. Though it cost all you have, get understanding.’ Proverbs 4:7b. The Book.

‘Knowledge will take you so far. Wisdom will take you further’. (Anon)

 

Poem For Good Friday: Oneing

20170414 A POEM FOR GOOD FRIDAY POEM

In our mind’s eye
we gaze into the eyes of God
and our souls declare, ‘God lives!’

We see God’s eyes gazing back
and our souls declare, ‘God loves!’

Perception matters.
With eyes of atoms our egos look around and declare God is nowhere.

With eyes of light, imagination, and intuition, we look at
stars, and trees, and plants, and people,
and our souls declare God is now here.

One seeing, one knowing, one love.
Oneing.

As an amateur astronomer, whenever I can, I’m in awe as I gaze upward, using a Meade 12 inch telescope, at the marvels of planets, stars, nebulae and more. The photo, above, taken by NASA, is the Helix Nebula, also known NGC 7293. It is a large planetary nebula located in the constellation Aquarius. It’s commonly known as the Eye of God. Isn’t it beautiful?

 

Celtic Thought: Life Is Like…

20170413 LIFE IS LIKE...CELTIC THOUGHTAt the far end of my cottage’s garden in Capel Curig (in north Wales) is a rivulet. Hidden by trees and gorse bushes, it rushes by the northern boundary, invisible to all, except to me and a few locals. It’s so small – you can leap over it – it has no name, except for the one I gave it. To me, this ‘watery companion’ is: Bach ac yn gyflym. Welsh geographical place-names are very descriptive, and it seemed right to call this rivulet by this name. It means ‘small and fast’.

Here’s a few thoughts as I watched Bach ac yn gyflym flow by, and as (for some) we are nearing the end of a specially remembered week that culminated in dramatic events, that many take to heart.

Metaphorically, life is like a stream, perhaps something like Bach ac yn gyflym. I was going to write about encouraging you to step into that Life-stream, but I do believe we are all in it, already.

“You wander from room to room hunting for the diamond necklace that is already around your neck!” Rumi

This stream isn’t just life events as we experience them with all their surprises, twists and turns; it is that, but it is also more. There is more! Mae myw! It is Life, the Life-Giver itself (and apologies for that impersonal pronoun when Life itself is anything but impersonal, but Life is also beyond ‘he’ or ‘she’, and yet encapsulates both/all).

This Life-stream embraces us as we live life, and my encouragement then to myself and others, bearing in mind we are all already in that flow, is to encourage each of us to have an awareness and/or remembrance of being part of it.

“Then the angel showed me the river of the water of life, as clear as crystal, flowing from the throne of God and of the Lamb.” Revelation 22:1 The Book

As I sit and watch Bach ac yn gyflym flow by I witness leaves and debris float by. Some of it swirls into little eddies caused by indentations in the river bank, and stay there for a while. Out of the main flow of the stream, they may look or ‘feel’ safer and linger for a while, but the power they experienced just seconds before is diminished. And then, maybe unexpected to them, but not to me as an observer, the current catches them and off they go at great speed to their destination.

Maybe, we too, can feel safe or get comfortable, or maybe too safe and too comfortable, and object to the buffeting of life. In being too cosy, like those leaves in that riverbank indentation we can feel safe, but lose access to power and energy. Even in that ‘safe’ position we are still in the Life-stream, but maybe unaware. Even in that ‘safe’ position we have access to that power and energy. But, we don’t use it….after all, we’re (momentarily) unaware of it.

“May what I do flow from me like a river, no forcing and no holding back, the way it is with children.”  Rainer Maria Rilke

Being aware of our status (we’re all in that Life-stream) and aware of the power and energy (and that it is available to us), will, I think, put life events into perspective. There is no ‘maybe’ with a river, no need to barter, no worry of it stopping, no concern about where it is going or its destination. It flows. It knows. It is.

It’s flowing now, carrying us in an amazing ever-changing movement in that Divine, energetic dance, and if we’re quiet we might just ‘hear it’ and experience its all-embracing love. And then, the next step is to revel in that Life-flow wherever we are or whatever our circumstances might be, to enjoy its energy for good (purposes), and to pass (recognition of) it on to others. What do you think?

“I would love to live like a river flows, carried by the surprise of its own unfolding.” John O’Donohue