Essential Celt: Angels In Essex?: Close Encounters

160111 essential celt angels in essex THOUGHTS

‘Angels, living light most glorious! Beneath the Godhead in burning desire in the darkness any mystery of creation you look on the eye of your God never taking your fill: What glorious pleasures take shape within you.’ Hildegard

We live in a sceptical age, and there is seldom talk about angels, even in many churches. The result is that anyone who talks about angels is likely to be branded ‘new age’ (no disrespect to those amongst my friends who call themselves’ new age’). By default, the subject of angels is left to others – who talk a lot about angels, and why not? – and I think those who might not consider angels as much are the poorer for it. But, it doesn’t have to be this way.

What do you think?

Down the ages, Celts, Druids and wiccan people, and others, accepted (almost ‘casually’) the existence of angels (by one name or another), as do many of my Christian, Druid, Wiccan and other friends (Light-workers etc) today.

‘The Celtic mind was not burdened by dualism. It did not separate what belongs together’. John O’Donohue

Angels are said to guard individuals (Psalm 91:11), and even sang at creation’s dawn (Job 38:7). We’re commended to extend hospitality to strangers, lest they might be angels (Hebrew 12:2). And they ministered to Jesus (Luke 22:43 et all).

Angels and angelic encounters, then, are not the domain of one particular belief-group, but open to all.

Have you seen an angel? Have you encountered an angel? Would you like to?

This is one of my favourite, almost humourous, accounts from the Book: Peter, having miraculously escaped from prison, ‘…knocked at the outer entrance, and a servant named Rhoda came to answer the door. When she recognized Peter’s voice, she was so overjoyed she ran back without opening it and exclaimed, ‘Peter is at the door!’.

‘You’re out of your mind,’ they told her. When she kept insisting that it was so, they said, ‘It must be his angel.’

But Peter kept on knocking, and when they opened the door and saw him, they were astonished. Acts 12:13-16. The Book.

Scepticism & Change: So, why the scepticism? Why can’t we expect to see an angel in Essex?

The scepticism exists, in part, I believe, because it goes unidentified, and therefore unchallenged. We don’t ‘label’ it, and we should. We consider ‘our way’ of thinking ‘normal’, and others, from a different group or belief system or from another age in history (as we read those ancient records), if they think or say something different to us, must be  ‘wrong’.  And, so what they say is discarded.

We can suffer with an unhealthy dose of twenty-first century arrogance, a huge amout of materialism, even as we seek out Celtic ways!

Celtic ways were different to ours, and so any honest desire to ‘recapture’ the passion and depth of their ways, will result in some upset, some ‘judder’ and some honest appraisal of our own personal theology. If you are concerned at the aforementioned sentence, please don’t read on.

But, once we’re aware of such scepticism – once we can, metaphorically, hold it at arms length and objectively inspect it for what it is – then we can make adjustments, and look at things differently, and see, just as the Celts of old, did.

Hint 1: Are you sceptical? Be objective! Check to see if you’re a sceptic, and if so,  work on it!

Perception: And, why don’t we see angels in Essex or elsewhere? Maybe we’re not looking, maybe we  are too busy, or perhaps we don’t have the awareness-tools to perceive them.

It’s interesting, that on several occasions in the Book, angels appeared to people as they took shelter from the noon-day sun in the shade of a tree, or in their homes – places where they might be expected to rest, or make time for themselves, and ponder.

‘Pay attention to your dreams – God’s angels often speak directly to our hearts when we are asleep.’ Eileen Elias Freeman.

Yes, angels can appear even in our dreams. Here’s a record of my most memorable dream about angels: [Link]

Hint 2: Are you too busy? If so,  make some time for yourself, time to  relax,  ponder, even day-dream, to make time for an encounter.

Expect the unexpected:  We sometimes relegate angels to a bygone age. Oh, that was then, and this is now. Things are different now. Perhaps we’ve entered a different epoch and it all works out differently today? Some say. Maybe not.

Have you read the accounts of the Angels of Mons? On 22–23 August 1914, it is recorded that during the first major engagement of the British Expeditionary Force , the British troops were protected by angels!

And what about this video clip? Much more recent. Okay, you won’t see an angel, but just listening to, and watching the reaction of an outside news broadcaster on the banks of the River Thames in London is worth its weight in gold. [Link]

I think, generally, we’re still too ready to explain things away.

Hint 3: Do you jump to conclusions too quickly Sometimes its better to say, ‘I  just don’t know what happened’, and  come back to it later. Why not journal. Maybe it was an  angelic encounter?

Research: Why not read some accounts that others have had regarding angelic encounters?

The more ‘modern’ the account, personally, the better. When we only look at Victorian woodcarvings of angels, or dwell on those awesome renaissance paintings of veiled cherubs, or read ancient accounts (all good), when we only do that, we can subconsciously ‘program’ our mind to think that such encounters only happened in the past and don’t happen now. Oh, but such encounters do happen now!

 Hint 4: Why not read a contemporary book on angelic encounters? I have to  admit I like some books, on this theme, written by Doreen Virtue. I might not  agree with her theology, but the books are entertaining at the very least, and do  contain some  interesting accounts, to ‘fire up’ receptive neurons, and make us  more receptive.

Make a date: Many would think nothing of praying and asking God to assist them, and make time to pray, so why not ask angels? Infact, may of my wiccan and Druid friends, and others, do just that! Why not you?

Asking assistance – not the same as worshipping angels – doesn’t seem to be wrong, and seems a reasonable way to go. Infact, may in the biggest denomination in the West and many in the eastern Orthodox Church do just that. It has been said that one day, when our eyes are fully opened, we will be shocked (in a nice way) at the amount of angelic involvement in our lives.

 Hint 5: Why not ‘diarise’ an angelic encounter, or go to a place of solitude (for  me, that would be deep in a forest or at the summit of a mountain), and just be  still, and see what happens. It’s what many Celts of old did.

Becoming arational: One objection to angelic encounters is that is irrational, in an age of rationality, to believe that angels exist and can be encountered.

Arational: Not within the domain of what can be understood or analysed by reason; outside the competence of the rules of reason…

I would say that the belief in angels’ existence is arational! But, that isn’t a bad word.

If rationality is the way of the logical mind, and that which is irrational is discounting things because they fall outside what one can deem rational; then arational is okay – arational, such as the belief in angels are above and outside the realm the rational mind, and acceptable, because rational ‘rules’ and logic do not apply.

Hint 6: Consider the arational, and that angelic encounters, as with many other  spiritual concepts, operate to a higher form of understanding.

‘Imagination is more important than knowledge. For knowledge is limited to all we now know and understand, while imagination embraces the entire world, and all there ever will be to know and understand.’ Albert Einstein

If you have any queries, if you would like to know more about making time for angelic encounters, if you want to know about encountering angels in Essex or wherever you are (which is part of the ministry of Tadhg), then do contact me – leaving a message below, or sending a confidential ‘messenger’ message, or by emailing me: tadhg@tadhg.cymru

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