January’s Full Moon: The Quiet Moon: Ephemera

moon blog

To the ancients, ancient Celts and Druids, Wiccans, pagans and other ancient tribes-people the moon played a great part in their calendar, their daily and spiritual calendar, working and social life. It governed, not just the progression of the month, but also related life to the seasons, to the days’ length, to the planting and reaping of seed in agricultural communities. To them is was also a mystical body, shrouded in secrets, and many cultures have lively and interesting myths about the Moon.

’The moon looks upon many night flowers; the night flowers see but one moon.’ Jean Ingelow

And yet today many tend to minimise their focus on the moon. And even then, many of those who look at it do so only from a scientific viewpoint, and many urban dwellers may miss its birthing and dying and re-birthing all together, as it moves across the sky, blocked by city high-rise buildings, as it faithfully revolves around the Earth every month.

It is worth making the effort to travel to a less-cluttered environment to gaze at the Moon at its fulness. To ponder, to wonder, to give thanks.

‘When I admire the wonders of a sunset or the beauty of the moon, my soul expands in the worship of the creator.’ Mahatma Gandhi

For the astronomically inclined the Moon orbits the Earth in the prograde direction and completes one revolution relative to the stars in about 27.3 days (a sidereal month), and one revolution relative to the Sun in about 29.5 days (a synodic month). But, there’s more.

Yes, the first full moon of the year occurs on Friday, 10 January 2020 at 7.21pm (UTC/Greenwich Mean Time) in the constellation of Gemini.

It will appear low in the eastern sky at that time, near the stars Castor and Polux (The Twins), and close by the Moon will be the star Wasat (Arabic for ‘the middle’), and interestingly it ‘sits’ in the middle of the waist of Castor and Polux. As the night progresses so the Moon will climb higher in the night sky.

’The full moon – the mandala of the sky.’ Tom Robbins

To the Celts this full Moon was/is known as the Quiet Moon, but the Wolf Moon to those of medieval England and ancient and latter-day Wiccan. Others may know it as the Cold Moon, the Ice Moon or the Old Moon. But, there’s even more.

Some time ago I penned this poem about the moon:

Arianrhod in all her splendour, moves by an invisible hand
and wanders companionless, like a silver wheel in the sky. She ascends.
This full moon’s lucid beam dominates the now darkened canopy, and
there, in her smiling face, we find sweet, unbridled understanding.
She befriends.

Her ‘lesser light’ moves across the sky above the city, grey.
Oh, robed in splendour, her surge of silver-light fills every window pane
and skips across rooftops, trees, streams, fairy fires, and silent railway,
and falls unbeknown on those who sleep now, and refreshment regain.
A blessing.

Arianrhod, spill your beauty on a thousand Earthly races,
on happy flowers that bloom in a myriad of hues,
on laughing, smiling, sad and all up-looked faces,
who, in wilding spaces, drink your wine of sweet, bless’d fallen dew.
A gracious infilling.

And paled now is her light,
as onward she moves lower in the sky. For the sun, opportune.
But, for now, dear Arianrhod reigns with love. She is mistress of the night.
A timely witness sent by the Truth who is beyond the Moon.
A glorious remembrance.

I’m not sure if you will seek out the Moon this Friday (and the weekend, why not?), but my encouragement is for you to do so. Gaze in silence for a few minutes at that bright disk with its smiling face looking back, maybe verbalise a prayer (see below), or raise a glass to it, and ponder on the awesomeness of the Moon and the Moon-maker.

O Divine Presence
Bless to me the lustre of your signs and wonders,
traces of our final home in land and sea and sky.
As you have made the mark of heaven in a human face,
may I see the imprint of your family likeness in every living thing
that your blessing might radiate
each day and each night,
until heaven and earth are One.

The Celtic Wheel Of The Year, Tess Ward

Wishing you and those whom you love the blessings of the Moon-maker

Tadhg

 

 

1 thought on “January’s Full Moon: The Quiet Moon: Ephemera

  1. Pingback: January Full Moon: Quiet Moon – Wrycrow

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