Wonderful Plants. “Lavender Blue, Dilly Dilly…”

As a Celtic, Druid, Pagan, Christian or other faith, it is wonderful to talk about Lavender. Lavender can be used by sacred events, used at home, used by the kitchen, and in the garden (or balcony in a city). I love lavender. They’re ancient English plants, are good herbs, are good for sacred wonders, are greatly fragrantly etc, and the 1849 lyrics by James Halliwell was used when I was (about 1961) a primary school boy, and song was, “Lavender’s blue, dilly, dilly, lavender’s green; When am I king, dilly, dilly; you shall be queen…” etc. Though some parts of the lyrics weren’t ‘completed’ used.

However, the Lavender (Angustifolia Hidcote) is doing well now by me, and it is loved by the bees. My front of the garden has a lovely Japanese Maple (Acer Palmatum), and grass, and ivy). If you’re able to buy lavender or anything similar, please do what you can to suggest for bees – they need it.

Do use Lavender it at other sacred (isn’t everything so) events, and use it at home, in your garden (how about buying one this week) or at a city balcony. 

  • Botanical name: Lavender angustifolia
  • Temperate Zones: 5-8Blooming times:: June to August
  • Height: 2 to 3 feet (60 to 90cm)
  • Flower colours: Lavender in deep blue-purple, light pink, or white.

For working for the kitchen, Lavender buds, it is said, are best when harvested right before they fully open (if you know when this is), and

  • Immerse some dried lavender buds in a jar of sugar, and you may sugar for baking and in desserts.
  • Add some flower buds to preserves or fruit compotes.
  • Chop fresh buds and add to add them as a cake batter or sweet pastry dough.
  • Use some fresh lavender to infuse teas and other beverages.
  • Sprinkle bits of fresh lavender on a salad as a part of a garnish.
  • Use chopped lavender buds and leaves to flavour roast lamb, chicken, or rabbit etc.

Some believe, spiritually, that lavender as an unction promotes peace, cleanliness, and love.

Poem From Kahlil Gibran’s ‘The Prophet’

And now you ask in your heart,

“How shall we distinguish that which is good in pleasure from that which is not good?” 

Go to your fields and your gardens, and you shall learn that it is the pleasure of the bee to gather honey of the flower, 

But it is also the pleasure of the flower to yield its honey to the bee. 

For to the bee a flower is a fountain of life, 

And to the flower a bee is a messenger of love, 

And to both, bee and flower, the giving and the receiving of pleasure is a need and an ecstasy. 

People of Orphalese, be in your pleasures like the flowers and the bees.

Conclusion: There is a wonderful fragrance from Lavenders at this time of the year. And, if you haven’t got a Lavender, my suggestion buy one plant of it this summer. I love Lavender, and have about thirty of of them in the front garden. Yes, I love them.

Ogham Alphabets And More: Hauthe Or Hawthorn

Here is some information for the Hawthorn tree or Hauthe the Ogham details for the alphabet, it’s full moon name, and the Hawthorns spirituality and mythology 

So, here’s more about it.

Ogham Details:

  • Name as the Hawthorn tree or Huathe 
  • Huathe pronounced Hoh-uh
  • The tree is energetic, strength, a decision-maker
  • Alphabet for one that ours calls: H
  • Ogham has one ‘stave’ to the left (see photo below)
  • Its month or moon month is: 13 May – 9 June

Poem: Siegfried Sassoon:

Not much to me is yonder lane 
Where I go every day; 
But when there’s been a shower of rain 
And hedge-birds whistle gay, 
I know my lad that’s out in France 
With fearsome things to see 
Would give his eyes for just one glance 
At our white hawthorn tree. 

Spirituality

The Hawthorn is associated with the realm of the Fae and it tandems the oak and ash trees  with them, too.

Some Christians believed that hawthorn branches formed that crown of thorns that adorned the bloodied heads of Jesus at the Crucifixion. It is also thought that Joseph of Arimathea planted the Holy Thorn Tree while traveling with the Holy Grail after Jesus’ death by going to Glastonbury in Britain

Ecology

Hawthorn has a matched capacity to support local wildlife. Hawthorn tree or hedgerows have been often seen teeming with life, and it is said the Celts definitely noticed this by birds and rodents nearby.

The Latin word for the Hawthorn is called crataegus, and it comes from the Greek ‘kratos’ for hardness of its wood, and for ‘akis’ to mean sharp. Its thorns are known by many who are might unaware of it. They are prolific.

Previous Oghams Used:

Ogham Alphabet: Saille

and

Ogham Alphabet: Fearn Or Alder

Arianrhod. The Full Moon (Eclipse) In White And Cerise: Poem (Haiku)

Here is a poem, a haiku (or liturgy) of the next full moon (and for some, an eclipse moon) due on Wednesday, 26th May), of Arianrhod and the Elements. For those who will see the eclipse of the moon, the colour may become a cerise colour and similar, and others such as some Americans, Chinese people and others may like the ‘moon full’ become a redness, and similar colour to some. Yes, for some the cherry hue means beauty and fortune for the moon at the eclipse.

POEM

Moon
The moon was quite white.
Now cerise as the eclipse
may make her hue, red.

Dear Arianrhod,
is her beauty and fortune,
to elementals.

Northerly
As elementals,
great Gnomes as northerly ones,
make the Earth so bright.

Make mountains and sands,
mammals, flora and fauna.
Blessèd
the white moon.

Easterly
Easterly, the Slyphs,
make the air, winds, hurricanes,
environments, all.

She makes the moon high,
and makes her above the clouds.
Blessèd the white moon.

Southerly
Of Salamanders ,
they make great fire, volcanoes,
houses, energy.

Above the high moon,,
this elemental is seen.
Blessèd the white moon.

Westerly
The waters are seen,,
in rivers, lakes, oceans, too,
Watery Undines.

As elementals,
she is seen in faucets, too.
Blessèd the white moon.

The Rainbow Blessing [Celtic Poem, Liturgy & Blessing] Reviewed

We live in a universe full of vibrant colour, and though we can only see part of the spectrum, what we can see is wonderful in its beauty.

We can witness the yellow radiance of the daily new-born sun as it rises above the horizon, to the deep red colour of evening and sunset. Grass, trees, flowers, a superabundance of insects and animals, nature arrayed in all its beauty is set before us in a blaze of colour, to gaze upon in awe and for us to be blessed.

The following, reviewed a few years ago, then, may be used as a poem for yourself or as liturgy in a ritual, and as a blessing to you and others:

Title: The Rainbow Blessing (By Tadhg Jonathan)

May the blessing of the red sun as it sinks below the horizon be yours.
May the blessing of orange, the colour of flame and hearth be yours.
May the blessing of the wild, green earth and all life be yours.
May the blessing of the blue sea and wind which calls forth waves upon it be yours.
May the blessing of indigo, the twilight colour of change and coolness be yours.
May the blessing of violet, the colour of majesty and might be yours.
And may all the colourful blessings of the God Of The Rainbow be upon you and yours, now and always.

Blessings, Tadhg.

Ah, The Kindly Face: The Poem Or Liturgy Of The Moon’s Face.

I love the changing moon.

You might, like me, have a liturgy you use each month – perhaps as a new moon, or like me you might like the monthly full moon. Here are words that can form as part of a liturgy or as a poem for the face’s moon. These words were used a year by me ago or so, and I like them to show the moon’s travail by us (as a full moon is due soon), but which can also be used for new moon words/liturgy soon after this liturgy/poem.

Not only do I like the moon because I am a Druidic-Christian (or as a Christo-Druid), and it fascinates me above the night’s sky, and as a poet it to meld words, but also as I am an amateur astronomer.

I hope this following liturgy/poem is useful to you.


Ah , The Kindly Face (Poem/Liturgy)

Ah, The kindly face.

The blessed Earth-maker moved and the Earth was split, rent asunder,
and its twin was created, yes, the the Moon was formed.
Blessed be the Moon-maker, who made this wonder,
and who created its face to look down upon us.

Ah, the kindly face.

The crown of the moon is Oceanus Frigoris, a place ancient and old.
A reminder that it is, indeed, the Sea of Cold,
and, best seen in winter.

One eye is Oceanus Tranquillitatis, the Sea of Tranquility, or peace,
where in July  nineteen sixty-nine humankind first set foot on the moon in Apollo eleven.
A fact to remember, in awe, as we gaze, upward, into the heaven[s].

The other eye is Mare Imbrium, the Sea of Rain.
It is the larger of the two, so no need for eye-strain.
But, on the day when it pours, and you choose to stay indoors,
it may be the Moon to whom you should complain.

For, the moon controls the tides, and does impact upon our weather
and part of the mouth on that face, Oceanus Procellarum, is the Sea of storms.
And, as you and I look upward, together
we now know.

But, there’s more, and no reason to quibble,
for that mouth
seems to dribble
into Mare Humorum, the Sea of Moisture,
to the south.

The blessed Earth-maker moved and the earth was split, rent asunder,
and the the Moon was formed.
Blessed be the Moon-maker, who made this wonder,
and who created its face to look down upon us.

Ah, the kindly face.

And, as we look up, and wisdom seek,
May we be a star in the (soon) waning Moon
May we be a staff to the weak.1

Ah, the kindly face.

The Days Are Cold: A Winter’s Song/Poem



London has had its second gust of the snow in February, though the north of England, Wales and Scotland had even more over the last few days. I know some others in North America have much more, and so I thought I’d sing about something about the snow (from a song from the last year or two).

I like to sing, adapt words, use ancient tunes, and let my spirit dance to the Universe using words and tuneful sounds (or at least that’s the intention, but the Source of All accepts all that we have even if it’s not what some would call tuneful). I’d encourage you to do the same, that is sing with all that you have. Do feel free to use the song, below, in your group or individual times of ceremony as a song, or as a reflective (said) poem for the day.

The tune is  ‘The water is wide’ and an instrumental version to give you an idea of it, is here.  The ‘Water is wide’ is a A folk song of Scottish origin. The original lyrics and tune partly date to the 1600s and speak of an unhappy first marriage. I’ve changed the words to reflect the season of winter, but kept the tune which seems deeply reflective to suit the words of the newly-penned song and the season.

THE DAYS ARE COLD
A winter’s Song/Poem

The days are cold
And night comes soon.
The circle turns
As in days of old.
Nature does sleep
And the winds do howl
And my eyes do weep
Through the cold air now

The snow falls harsh
Upon the land
There is a light
Within and without
We raise our hands
To the source of all
And nature responds
with elementals call.

The days of change
Are here again
Our voices raise
To a loud refrain
We wish you peace
We wish you well.
All nature sings
Winter’s fare thee well.

In the link to the tune above, the tune starts at 10 seconds into the Youtube music and concludes at 51 seconds (and that tune is then used three times for the three verses above).

Blessings from Tadhg.

In Praise Of Water (Revisited): Poem/Liturgy

2020816 IN PRASIE OF WATER REVISITED

‘Water, water everywhere…’. Samuel Taylor Coleridge

From the beginning of this month we moved, ritually, into the season of autumn (from a northern hemisphere viewpoint).  Lughnasadh (1 August, though some opinions may differ by a few days) was the first day of the season.

That date was also the festival of the first harvest (wheat, barley etc), and half way through this season is Alban Elfed or Autumn Equinox (22 September) which is the time of the second harvest (soft fruits etc), culminating in Samhain (31 October), which is the third harvest of the season (of berries and nuts).

But, there’s more.

For the season of autumn the compass, cardinal point is west; and the predominating element is water; and water is the theme of this short article.

’We live on a blue planet that circles around a ball of fire next to a moon that moves the sea, and you don’t believe in miracles?’.  Anonymous

In our groves, faith groups or solo rituals and practices, it is good to be reminded, especially in this water-orientated  season, of this precious liquid. It is a necessity for life, is the object of our gratitude for it, and the source of our sheer wonderment that it occurs on this planet, and in such abundance – this is surely the ‘blue planet’.

Water is sacred.

It can teach us about Life and it can teach us about life (note the capital L and lower case use of the letter – to denote Life in all its mystery, and life in the ‘small things’ of our daily life), or is there no real division?

‘Water is fluid, soft, and yielding. But water will wear away rock, which is rigid and cannot yield. As a rule, whatever is fluid, soft, and yielding will overcome whatever is rigid and hard. This is another paradox: what is soft is strong.’ Lao Tzu

In our rituals we might spend some time pouring some water from a jug into a bowl, and meditating of the wonder of water. Or, we might pour water into a cup, at some point during our ceremonies, to sip ad savour cold water, and meditate upon it. Or we might pour some out onto the garden (or window box or potted plant) as a libation – a sacred ‘thank offering’ to the Great Water Giver.

’A drop of water, if it could write out its own history, would explain the universe to us.’ – Lucy Larcom

Whatever you do, be encouraged to do one, or more things, water orientated in this ‘water’ season. If you’re fortunate to have rain (in these exceptionally hot and dry days), wrap up safely, grab a raincoat and/or umbrella and go for a walk – all the time appreciating the cool rain, and maybe, purposely getting wet to enjoy the moment. Even more reason to give gratitude.

’All water is holy water.’ Rajiv Joseph

In our liturgy – the spoken parts of our ceremonies – you might find the following poem (or is it a prayer of gratitude) penned by me a few years ago, useful, as part of the ritual.

But, there’s (even) more.

In our very being, the ‘exterior’ composed mainly of water, and in our spirit and soul, as well as our bodies, we are intrinsically connected to water, in actuality as well as a metaphor, of life in all its sacredness.

Water.

The vast oceans, that which sustains life on Earth,
which move at the behest of the moon,
the rolling tides that contains a myriad of sea-life, from plankton to the behemoth,
that which quenches the world’s need,
and from which all nourishment is assured,
acknowledgement is given.

From clouds you pour out rain upon the Earth, and enrich it.
Mighty lakes appear from which  ancient forests of growing trees are fed,
and daily bread is produced for our table.
An abundance for many,
and a veritable gift from the Great Water-Giver.
Bountiful.

It soothes and it heals.
For when an angel’s wing sweeps
across the surface of the Pool,
then healing takes place, and there is restoration.
Health-giving.

It’s cleansing power, daily, washes the body,
and restores vitality.
A clean start. A refreshing start. A new start.
All is washed away.
And, in it celebration commences,
in appreciation, in sport, in swimming and in children’s’ play.
Joyfulness.

It quenches the soul, it nurtures the spirit;
and from those who are aware,
springs of sanctifying water flow,
and outward pour,
to friends, to enemies,
to those near, and to those far away.
To all.

Water.
Whether we have much, or little,
may the words, “Come, all. Drink. Share”, be on our lips.
Praise to the Great Water-Giver.

Note: Apologies for the wrong symbol for water used in the ‘header’ photo. The triangle should, infact, be pointing down to represent water in the four classical symbols. Pointing up represents air. Mea culpa!

 

 

The Ever-changing Moon: A Moon Phase Poem/Liturgy

20200714 MOON PHASE POEM LITURGY

The moon is more than an usually large rock circling the world, more than just an object to be scientifically studied, it connects us all. And, it represents our ‘inner world’, those hidden emotions that are locked away, our desires, even our shadow-self of fears and worries. And, as it encircles the Earth, its feminine energy also represents our dreams and ambitions.

Here’s some words written in awe of the ever-changing moon. You can recite them, view them; and use them as uplifting words, a poem, or even as a liturgy for you to incorporate into any full moon or new moon ceremony you might have.

Here are those words written with the methodical and ever-changing phases of the moon in mind:

The Moon in its endless circling around the Earth,
reminds us of the Moon-Maker’s loving dance around each one of us;
It announces the changing seasons of time, and
declares to all the never-ending cycle of nature.

Maker of the New Moon, the invisible one in the sky,
plant new seeds of intention in dark places, to grow as in the womb.

Maker of the waxing crescent moon, the growing sliver of light,
may you give each one of us fresh energy to think and to do.

Maker of the half Moon, that hangs in the sky,
give us an eye for detail to overcome challenges and to grow.

Maker of the waxing gibbous moon, the three quarters lit Moon,
may we have patience  to wait, and patience to refine.

Maker of the Full Moon, we honour you, the One Behind It All.
Renew us by the Moon’s light,
bless us by the Moon’s power,
and, rekindle in us a desire to respect You, nature and one another.
May we grow and blossom into our full status.

Maker of the waning gibbous moon, the lessening three-quarters circle of light,
give us the ability to discern what to keep, what to grow, and what to harvest.

Maker of the lessening half moon, that slowly diminishes,
may we have the courage to forgive, and the ability to be transformed.

Maker of the waning crescent, that decreasing sliver of light  in the sky,
enable us to surrender, to rest, and consider new ways to ‘be’ and to do.

The Moon in its endless circling around the Earth,
reminds us of the Moon-Maker’s loving dance around each one of us;
It announces the changing seasons of time, and
declares to all the never-ending cycle of nature.

Ah, The Kindly Face (Lunar Poem) & Your ‘Full Moon Ceremony’ Invitation

ah the kindly face

There’s a full moon this coming weekend. In anticipation of that, below is a poem that will be part of the middle section of a Full Moon Ceremony and in addition to the liturgy , and here’s your invitation to that Ceremony.

FULL MOON CEREMONY
Tadhg’s FaceBook Page / Live-Streaming

And, you’re invited from the comfort of your own home!

Friday, 3 July 2020 At 8pm (UK Time)

To view that FaceBook livestreaming ceremony you will need to ‘friend’ Tadhg, and details/links about that, and an outline of the liturgy (printable) are highlighted after the poem. I hope to see you there. (Oh, to participate even more, why not have a candle and matches ready for the event).

Ah, the poem  with the upcoming full moon in mind:

 

Ah, The Kindly Face (Poem)

The blessed Earth-maker moved and the Earth was split, rent asunder,
and its twin was created, yes, the the Moon was formed.
Blessed be the Moon-maker, who made this wonder,
and who created its face to look down upon us.

Ah, the kindly face.

The crown of the moon is Oceanus Frigoris, a place ancient and old.
A reminder that it is, indeed, the Sea of Cold,
and, best seen in winter.

One eye is Oceanus Tranquillitatis, the Sea of Tranquility, or peace,
where in July  nineteen sixty-nine humankind first set foot on the moon in Apollo eleven.
A fact to remember, in awe, as we gaze, upward, into the heaven[s].

The other eye is Mare Imbrium, the Sea of Rain.
It is the larger of the two, so no need for eye-strain.
But, on the day when it pours, and you choose to stay indoors,
it may be the Moon to whom you should complain.

For, the moon controls the tides, and does impact upon our weather
and part of the mouth on that face, Oceanus Procellarum, is the Sea of storms.
And, as you and I look upward, together
we now know.

But, there’s more, and no reason to quibble,
for that mouth
seems to dribble
into Mare Humorum, the Sea of Moisture,
to the south.

The blessed Earth-maker moved and the earth was split, rent asunder,
and the the Moon was formed.
Blessed be the Moon-maker, who made this wonder,
and who created its face to look down upon us.

Ah, the kindly face.

And, as we look up, and wisdom seek,
May we be a star in the (soon) waning Moon
May we be a staff to the weak.1

Ah, the kindly face.

 

Note 1: May we be a star in the waning Moon. May we be a staff to the weak. Quoted from the Carmina Gadelica (slightly adapted).

 

LiveStreaming & Liturgy Notes for the Full Moon Ceremony

Live-Streaming Video: To view this  streaming videos, you need to be a FaceBook friend of Tadhg’s as that it where the ‘broadcast’ can/will be seen. So: If you’re already a friend, or you’re been able to see many of my morning ‘Thought For The Day’ broadcasts via my Facebook site then you’re good to go.

If you’re new, not on my  FaceBook friend’s list or are not sure, do check here. If don’t see many previous videos there, or if you can’t gain full access to read that  Facebook webpage then you’ll need to become a Facebook friend. To become a Facebook friend: press the ‘friends’ link on my Facebook site – that link above. I’ll accept as soon as I can, and, when I do, please try the link again  to see if you can gain access, in readiness for the ‘broadcast’. If you still can’t get access, or if there’s any ‘challenges’, please email me, at: tadhgtemp@googlemail.com.

Liturgy: The first part and last part of the Full Moon Ceremony liturgy will more or less remain the same, and so there will be some continuity. The middle section will change in many parts, with the inclusion of today’s poem, different music and other words, so there will be some good surprises. Do print off the previous liturgy which can be found here. With or without the printed liturgy you are warmly invited, and encouraged to watch/participate at home as much as you wish to. Hope to see you there!

 

Header photo is copyrighted, all rights reserved, 2020, Pennie Ley (see here). Used  with permission. Many thanks Pennie

 

 

Experiencing ‘Thin places’ As The Ancients Did

20200617 EXPERIENCING THIN PLACES

Have you ever experienced a ‘thin place’? Here’s a brief outline of what a ‘thin place’ is,  how you can experience them, and a poem about them.

What Is A Thin Place

Have you ever travelled some distance to an ancient site, and almost heard the cry of the ancestors call out to you over the millennia from that place? You might have been walking in a forest, witnessed a flash of sunlight break through the forest canopy, and felt a deep stirring within?

Perhaps, you were in a rush, walking through a city street, and you stopped to cross the road and someone with a baby in a push chair stopped beside you and the baby smiled at you, and you felt a ‘warmth’ from somewhere else move in your core. These are all examples of  ‘thin places’.

Druids and ancient Celts held the view, and latter-day ones, and others, still hold the view, that there exist places, times and events where the separation between here and the Other, that veil, that threshold to the spiritual realm, can be unusually ‘thin’ and can be touched, encountered, felt, experienced. These, they called them ‘thin places, and they still exist today, and you can experience them, too.

‘There is an indefinable, mysterious power that pervades everything. I feel it, though I do not see it. It is this unseen power that makes itself felt and yet defies all proof, because it is so unlike all that I perceive through my senses. It transcends the senses.’ Mahatma Gandhi

In one sense, the ancient Druids and Celts never ‘suffered’ with dualism as we do, and so it seems odd to speak of here and the Other. Perhaps, a way forward is to understand that that Oneness always exists. But, with our minds focussed on the busyness of the day, we need some encouragement and opportunity to have that awareness revealed to us. Like a muscle, such awareness grows over time, so that we can be more easily aware of ‘thin places’, and enjoy them.

So, a ‘thin place’ or caol áit (a Celtic/Gaelic word, pronounced ‘kweel awtch’) is a time, place or event where we are aware of the closeness of the Other.

Throughout the United Kingdom there are places described as holy or sacred by others – not just religious buildings, but, more than likely old oak or yew trees (some hundreds of years old), streams or valleys, standing stones and many other notable places which have been (and still, are) visited by celts (ancient and latter-day) and other spiritual pilgrims, such as fellow-Druid friends, and Wiccan friends etc. But, other places, such as forests, even city streets could be a ‘thin place’ as well as an ancient site in the country where you live. Geographically, though they abound in Wales and the other three countries of the UK, but, they are worldwide, there may be one or more’ thin places’ near you. They may not occur in just ancient places or places of grandeur.  Your local park? Your kitchen? Your backyard? Who knows?

‘The soul should always stand ajar, ready to welcome the ecstatic experience’.
Emily Dickinson

There could be times when ‘thin places’ occur – long-lived over the centuries or fleeting. You might experience a ‘thin place’ in an area on day, and when you go back to replicate the experience – nothing. The moment has gone. But, who knows what other times of opportunity (kairos, rather than chronos), will present themselves to you in the future, if aware. To be sure, sometimes ‘thin places’ will feel powerful and ‘electric’, and at other times may hardly be noticeable and almost ‘shy’. But, wherever you find one, revel in that moment, that encounter with the Other’. They always convey deep meaning.

‘I have a feeling that my boat
has struck, down there in the depths,
against a great thing.
And nothing
happens! Nothing…Silence…Waves…

–Nothing happens? Or has everything happened,
and are we standing now, quietly, in the new life?’

― Juan Ramón Jiménez

And, then there are meaningful events where you might encounter a ‘thin places’. These might be  at various events, such as at the birth of a baby, at the passing on of a loved one, or at the announcement of some amazing or traumatic event, an impending storm, when we view beauty, for example. All of these can be the ‘judder’ that we experience in life that speaks of, and points to That Which Is Bigger Than Us, through the encounter of a ’thin place’. At times like that it catches our breath, time seems to stand still and we’re ‘catapulted’ into a higher reality.

How To Increase Awareness

‘Thin Places, as described above cannot be manufactured, but who knows how many we pass because we’re unaware? So, how do you increase your opportunity of finding  them? Well,

  • you could do some local research of ancient sites and ruins, especially ones marked in some way by those of yesteryear, or look for forest paths that take you to quiet areas, and
  •  you could hone your alertness. You might notice that there’s a strange feeling of quietness in a place, like the feeling of an approaching thunderstorm;  or you get a skin or inward sensation that is beyond description, then it may be a ‘thin place’, and
  •  be aware. You might pause in an area where such an occurrence is likely. Yes, use your senses eg sight, hearing, touch, smell and taste, but don’t forget that sixth sense ie intuition, and if needed, do check out the likelihood of a ‘thin place’ by meditating, by half closing your eyes and seeing with the ‘inward eyes’ of the imaginal.
  •  ‘open the door’. It might be beneficial to conduct a ritual in the open, and especially where you feel a ‘thin place’ may exist. If there isn’t a ‘thin place’ there, then you have still conducted a beneficial ritual. If you notice, however, that the ritual becomes very easy to do, ‘races along’ as though turbo charged, or you feel or notice the input of the ‘invisible others’ than you have ‘found’ a ‘thin place’. This could manifest itself as a feel, an event of synchronicity, or in nature, perhaps, by the inquisitiveness of an animal that approaches and stops to look on,  Ofcourse, it could be that the ‘invisible others’ have found you, and in your honest desire to look for to a ‘thin place’ they have brought it to you!

So, have you experienced a ‘thin place’ – a place, time, or event where the gap between here and the Other has been unusually ‘thin’?

Poem

Here’s a poem I wrote some time ago about ‘thin places’:

Atop a high mountain or in the dark valley below,
in the corner of your room, or in the hustle and bustle of the busy city centre,
may you find a ‘thin place’.
A place, or time, or event so unique, so full of wonder, so sublime.

A place where Heaven and earth collide,
and the diaphanous veil of separation is unusually thin.
A time where you can almost feel angelic wings beat against your cheeks,
and see the Divine smile shining through.
An event where your heartbeat quickens,
and you experience the mystery of the Other in the mundane.

A ‘thin place’ is a threshold, a limen, a holy bridge,
a door to the Throne Room, slightly opened.
It is a moment in time and space,
in which we can dwell, and dance, and move, if aware.

A ‘thin place’ is an encouragement, a sacred invitation to draw near,
to approach barefoot, in humility, in reverence and awe.
It is both seen and unseen.
Invisible we see you!

May you, in the wilderness of the countryside or the city,
find a ‘thin place’, and be blessed.