Ephemera: Harvest Moon: Facts & Myth (Lunation 1207)

EPHEMERA FULL MOON HARVEST MOON

The next full moon is almost upon us. And here is:

  • some facts about this full moon
  • a moon-related tale form ancient Wales

We know, scientifically, that without the moon, the Earth would be a very different place than it is today, and that it is unlikely that it would have been able to sustain life at all. Just a coincidence that we have a moon of such magnitude?

We know the Earth is is that ‘Goldilock’s Zone’, of just being the right distance from the Sun to harbour life. Too close and the surface of the Earth would ‘fry’, too far away and it would be too cold for life. Just a coincidence?

I cannot accept that it’s just a coincidence. The One Behind It All was, and still is at work, and so as you and I  see the next Full moon, let us gaze in awe and silence at the marvel, that is the Moon, and The One Behind It All, the Universe, The Source, Love, The Friend, or any other suitable Name we wish to utter.

Facts & Lunation

The next Full moon tomorrow, Monday, 3 August 2020 at 4.58pm (from a UK viewpoint for this article) in the constellation of Capricorn.

This Full moon marks the midway point of Lunation #1207. A lunation is the astronomers’ name for the lunar month (of approximately 29 1/2 days), and starts with each new moon. This system of moon counting was invented by Professor Ernest W Brown in 1933, and he started the count with lunation number 1 at the first new moon of 1923. And the count has progressed from there, so we are now at the midway point of lunation 1207. For the inquisitive amongst you that might be asking what about the counting of lunar months before 1923 from a later perspective? The answer is, astronomers give them a negative number working back from the last new moon of 1922 which would be lunation -1.

“Harvest moon: around the pond I wander and the night is gone.” Matsuo Basho (1644-1694, Japanese poet)

Infact, this Full moon may be disappointing low in the sky, and won’t drift above the horizon until about 9.15pm, reaching its highest point at around midnight. If it’s a clear night, do look to the right of the moon (and up a little) and you might be fortunate enough to see the planets Saturn and Jupiter nearby in the constellation of Sagittarius.

”But even when the moon looks like it’s waning…it’s actually never changing shape. Don’t ever forget that.”  Ai Yazawa

To some, this full moon is known as the sturgeon Moon, the Dog Days Moon, but I like to think of it as the Grain Moon or Corn, the Harvest Moon, that being so relevant to the Lughnasadh celebration yesterday or last Friday, the first harvest of the year.

Others might call it the Dispute Moon. The reason for it to be called the Dispute Moon is many and varied, and may simply be so because, as autumn and winter approaches, one’s survival centred on the good-will of others, and the upcoming months wasn’t a time when disputes should be started or continued.

There is an ancient Celtic story that Cerridwen, the Welsh muse or goddess of inspiration, mentioned in the Black Book of Carmarthen, is a personification of the Moon.

”She used to tell me that a full moon was when mysterious things happen and wishes come true.” Shannon A. Thompson

Moon Myth/Story

True, there are stories of Cerridwen in daily life, living near lake Bala (and having stayed at Bala I can highly recommend that area of Wales) and giving birth to a son and a daughter. Sadly, it is said that her son, Morfan (also called Afagddu) was ugly and so she compensated by making him wise by using magic. But, these things never run to plan.

There is also a view that, alternately, or perhaps as well as having an earthy life, Cerridwen was the Moon personified. Her name, from Welsh to English can be interpreted (depending on how you divide her name) as being ‘fair’ and ‘loved’, or ‘crooked white one’. The latter, I hold dear, as it does sum up the shape of the bright crescent moon hanging in the sky, appearing stooped or crooked. And, doesn’t the Moon inspire and invoke other-worldly wisdom? Dear Cerridwen. Dear Morfan.

Conclusion

So, if ever there was a time to celebrate, maybe with bread and something alcoholic, the full moon, in the wake of the first harvest of the year is such a time, as you gaze in awe up to out celestial companion. It’s a wonderful time to  say a word or a prayer, raise a toast or offer a libation to the One who inspires us all, or just look up in silence and ponder the Moon-maker, The One Behind It All, The inspirer.”

It is a beautiful and delightful sight to behold the body of the Moon.“ Galileo Galilei

May the blessing of the Moon-Maker shine on you and all whom you love, and make you holy. Blessings, Tadhg

 

The Ever-changing Moon: A Moon Phase Poem/Liturgy

20200714 MOON PHASE POEM LITURGY

The moon is more than an usually large rock circling the world, more than just an object to be scientifically studied, it connects us all. And, it represents our ‘inner world’, those hidden emotions that are locked away, our desires, even our shadow-self of fears and worries. And, as it encircles the Earth, its feminine energy also represents our dreams and ambitions.

Here’s some words written in awe of the ever-changing moon. You can recite them, view them; and use them as uplifting words, a poem, or even as a liturgy for you to incorporate into any full moon or new moon ceremony you might have.

Here are those words written with the methodical and ever-changing phases of the moon in mind:

The Moon in its endless circling around the Earth,
reminds us of the Moon-Maker’s loving dance around each one of us;
It announces the changing seasons of time, and
declares to all the never-ending cycle of nature.

Maker of the New Moon, the invisible one in the sky,
plant new seeds of intention in dark places, to grow as in the womb.

Maker of the waxing crescent moon, the growing sliver of light,
may you give each one of us fresh energy to think and to do.

Maker of the half Moon, that hangs in the sky,
give us an eye for detail to overcome challenges and to grow.

Maker of the waxing gibbous moon, the three quarters lit Moon,
may we have patience  to wait, and patience to refine.

Maker of the Full Moon, we honour you, the One Behind It All.
Renew us by the Moon’s light,
bless us by the Moon’s power,
and, rekindle in us a desire to respect You, nature and one another.
May we grow and blossom into our full status.

Maker of the waning gibbous moon, the lessening three-quarters circle of light,
give us the ability to discern what to keep, what to grow, and what to harvest.

Maker of the lessening half moon, that slowly diminishes,
may we have the courage to forgive, and the ability to be transformed.

Maker of the waning crescent, that decreasing sliver of light  in the sky,
enable us to surrender, to rest, and consider new ways to ‘be’ and to do.

The Moon in its endless circling around the Earth,
reminds us of the Moon-Maker’s loving dance around each one of us;
It announces the changing seasons of time, and
declares to all the never-ending cycle of nature.

Moonemclature (sp): A Poem About Full Moon Names

MOONEMCLATURE

As you now, I like to use the ancient and tribal names for the moon, relating to the month in which the full moon appears, in liturgy – especially the Full Moon ceremonies. It tells us a lot about how the ancient Celts, Druids, Jews, Christians, Pagans and others regarded and revered the moon, and the One Behind It All; and it connects us to the past, so that there is a very real link, a spiritual continuity as we look up to gaze in awe at the rolling sphere(s).

For instance, to some, the August full moon was/is known as the Sturgeon Moon because of the fish in the Great Lakes fished by the Algonquin tribes, to others it’s known as the Barley Moon, and to others, such as then Anglo-Saxons of old, the Grain Moon.

Here’s a poem for the full moon for each month of the year.

JANUARY
The night air is still, Quiet Moon,
and frost on the ground is strewn.
Sounds are muted and all is at rest,
Warmed we are, and so truly blessed.
We remember you in our praise tonight,
this betwixt, magical time of twilight.

FEBRUARY
Moon of Ice, we greet you well,
your smile charms us like a subtle spell.
And, as upward we crane our necks to look,
you write love-letters on our heart’s invisible book.
As you look down upon us and see
in us a reflection of the Immutable Three.

MARCH
Open our hearts, our intellect and mind,
and search our ways, so that in you we find,
the reason for the smile on your face.
It is the ‘Moon of Winds’ Creator’s grace.
And, in gratitude and awe,
we cry out, insatiably, for more.

APRIL
We welcome you Growing Moon,
whose face is carved like a sublime, ancient rune,
to remind us to look above and beyond,
to revere your light in that ancient pond,
to honour with all, and with our soul,
honour you, the One Behind It All.

MAY
The Bright Moon is May’s delight,
look kindly on Earth’s children tonight.
May we be blessed forever to be,
One with you, Eternal Three.
That divisions here on Earth, may cease,
as we celebrate this night as your timely feast.

JUNE
We honour you, Moon of Mead,
and lift up our heads, lift up our need,
that in you, you will supply,
our humble requests, hear our plaintive cry.
That we might be blessed in your light,
and revel in oneness this summer’s night.

JULY
We celebrate midsummer, Oh Moon of Corn,
that from darkness, you are now full-born.
Around us mirth and joy is heard,
You light the world by the Creator’s word.
Teach us to listen and observe
to nature’s wisdom, to love all, and all to serve.

AUGUST
Welcome Barley Moon, a beaming light
o’er the golden grain at night.
Reflecting sun, giving food for our table,
you hang there in a sky, in a sea the colour of sable.
Your light now full, this month in size you grew.
Dear bright moon, we welcome you.

SEPTEMBER
Welcome Singing Moon, of mirth and merriment,
of lovers’ poems, and words of lament.
At the close of day, upward many look and think,
and celebrate your beauty in song and drink.
And then in silence and awe,
we contemplate your beneficial, wholesome, tidal law.

OCTOBER
Welcome Harvest Moon, new light reborn,
keeping watch over the cultivated corn.
As the temperatures fall and air begins to chill,
as owl noises can be heard from dale and hill,
so may we, in wonderment, pause and be still.

NOVEMBER
Ah, Moon of Snow, we welcome you,
yellow light in a sea of blue.
Created by the One Behind It All,
Arianrhod, by your name we call,
you, once again, to be,
and seek you, from incumbrance us free.

DECEMBER
Cold Moon hanging in the darkened sky,
your love, your power, your face forever shy.
In awe we gaze upward, and and question, ‘why?’
Why should the Moon-Maker gift us,
with your smile so beauteous?
Cold Moon hanging in the darkened sky.

Ofcourse, there’s more. The above-mentioned poem can be used as liturgy by you in your solo Full Moon ceremonies, and perhaps you might like to use the particular part of the poem that relates to the month that your specific Full Moon ceremony covers. Indeed, within a couple of weeks a new Full Moon liturgy (Modwenna Rite) will appear on my blog, including this liturgy and more, ready for out next, inclusive, ‘open’, global, Full Moon ‘broadcast’ via FaceBook.

Finally, apologies for the misspelling of ‘nomenclature’ in the title of this article. It was deliberate. It so sounded like a (part) Moon spoonerism, that I couldn’t help but misspell it to describe the theme, moon names, moon nomenclature, of this article.

The moon header photograph is copyrighted: All rights reserved, 2020, Pennie Ley (see here). Used  with permission. Many thanks Pennie.

Ah, The Kindly Face (Lunar Poem) & Your ‘Full Moon Ceremony’ Invitation

ah the kindly face

There’s a full moon this coming weekend. In anticipation of that, below is a poem that will be part of the middle section of a Full Moon Ceremony and in addition to the liturgy , and here’s your invitation to that Ceremony.

FULL MOON CEREMONY
Tadhg’s FaceBook Page / Live-Streaming

And, you’re invited from the comfort of your own home!

Friday, 3 July 2020 At 8pm (UK Time)

To view that FaceBook livestreaming ceremony you will need to ‘friend’ Tadhg, and details/links about that, and an outline of the liturgy (printable) are highlighted after the poem. I hope to see you there. (Oh, to participate even more, why not have a candle and matches ready for the event).

Ah, the poem  with the upcoming full moon in mind:

 

Ah, The Kindly Face (Poem)

The blessed Earth-maker moved and the Earth was split, rent asunder,
and its twin was created, yes, the the Moon was formed.
Blessed be the Moon-maker, who made this wonder,
and who created its face to look down upon us.

Ah, the kindly face.

The crown of the moon is Oceanus Frigoris, a place ancient and old.
A reminder that it is, indeed, the Sea of Cold,
and, best seen in winter.

One eye is Oceanus Tranquillitatis, the Sea of Tranquility, or peace,
where in July  nineteen sixty-nine humankind first set foot on the moon in Apollo eleven.
A fact to remember, in awe, as we gaze, upward, into the heaven[s].

The other eye is Mare Imbrium, the Sea of Rain.
It is the larger of the two, so no need for eye-strain.
But, on the day when it pours, and you choose to stay indoors,
it may be the Moon to whom you should complain.

For, the moon controls the tides, and does impact upon our weather
and part of the mouth on that face, Oceanus Procellarum, is the Sea of storms.
And, as you and I look upward, together
we now know.

But, there’s more, and no reason to quibble,
for that mouth
seems to dribble
into Mare Humorum, the Sea of Moisture,
to the south.

The blessed Earth-maker moved and the earth was split, rent asunder,
and the the Moon was formed.
Blessed be the Moon-maker, who made this wonder,
and who created its face to look down upon us.

Ah, the kindly face.

And, as we look up, and wisdom seek,
May we be a star in the (soon) waning Moon
May we be a staff to the weak.1

Ah, the kindly face.

 

Note 1: May we be a star in the waning Moon. May we be a staff to the weak. Quoted from the Carmina Gadelica (slightly adapted).

 

LiveStreaming & Liturgy Notes for the Full Moon Ceremony

Live-Streaming Video: To view this  streaming videos, you need to be a FaceBook friend of Tadhg’s as that it where the ‘broadcast’ can/will be seen. So: If you’re already a friend, or you’re been able to see many of my morning ‘Thought For The Day’ broadcasts via my Facebook site then you’re good to go.

If you’re new, not on my  FaceBook friend’s list or are not sure, do check here. If don’t see many previous videos there, or if you can’t gain full access to read that  Facebook webpage then you’ll need to become a Facebook friend. To become a Facebook friend: press the ‘friends’ link on my Facebook site – that link above. I’ll accept as soon as I can, and, when I do, please try the link again  to see if you can gain access, in readiness for the ‘broadcast’. If you still can’t get access, or if there’s any ‘challenges’, please email me, at: tadhgtemp@googlemail.com.

Liturgy: The first part and last part of the Full Moon Ceremony liturgy will more or less remain the same, and so there will be some continuity. The middle section will change in many parts, with the inclusion of today’s poem, different music and other words, so there will be some good surprises. Do print off the previous liturgy which can be found here. With or without the printed liturgy you are warmly invited, and encouraged to watch/participate at home as much as you wish to. Hope to see you there!

 

Header photo is copyrighted, all rights reserved, 2020, Pennie Ley (see here). Used  with permission. Many thanks Pennie

 

 

June’s Full Moon & Your Full Moon Ceremony Invitation: Friday, 5 June 2020 At 8pm (UK Time)

MOON 2

Tomorrow (Friday) evening sees the June full moon in all its glory. Yes, it’s time to celebrate again. Below is an outline of the details of this moon – what sort of moon is it? A wolf moon? Wine moon? And you’ll find some astronomical data. But, you’ll also find your personal invitation to join in our second Full Moon Celebration online.

Full moon data &
Your personal Full Moon Celebration invitation. It’s live!
See below. Yes, you’re invited!

The next full moon is almost upon us. There is something mystical, ‘magical’ and calming about the full moon as it brightens and glides higher into the sky. No wonder the ancients paid particular attention to the Moon and each month it ushered in.

Full Moon Data
This full moon will be in its fullness on Friday, 5 June 2020,  just after 8pm (UK time) in the constellation of Scorpio. At that time it will be below the horizon (from a UK aspect) but IT will climb higher as the night goes on. It will be just above the horizon at 9.15pm and, in the southern sky in the northern hemisphere, it may be viewable to many nearer midnight or later.

Some will know this full moon as the Strawberry moon, to me and the ancient and latter-day Celts and Druids it is the Moon of Horses; to Wiccans many call is the Dyad Moon; and the Chinese people call it the Lotus Moon. In the southern hemisphere where the seasons are switched this full moon is known by some as the Oak Moon, the Cold Moon, or the Long Night’s Moon.

But, whatever name you call it, the full moon is a time for celebration: perhaps by walking in the light of the full moon (and have you ever seen your moon-shadow?) and pondering its awesomeness, raising a glass of wine to its glory, meditating on the Moon-Giver, or reciting liturgy or a poem in its honour and to honour the One Behind It All?

Ofcourse, all that can be done after our live celebration – after all, the moon won’t be visible until nearer midnight.

The ancients loved their stories (and perhaps we still do, but do so by+ going to the cinema, watching a movie on tv), and here’s a mythical and magical story from ancient times, though not notably Celtic or Druid in essence but still entertaining and through-provoking, about the moon.

There is a very interesting Chinese myth about this woman who was said to live on the moon. There are several variations of the myth but the essential story is that she and her husband were once immortal beings but were made mortal because of their extremely bad behaviour.

They attempted to regain immortality through the use of an immortality pill to raise them back to lofty heights, but Chang’e became greedy and took too much of  it, and ended up floating high into the sky and on onward  to the moon where she remained stuck forever. Perhaps, it is Chang’e’s face that looks down upon us?

She is the subject of much Chinese poetry and is one of the central reasons for celebration each Autumn during the Chinese Moon Festival. And, Chang’e was the name of the lunar probe sent to the far side of the moon by China about sixteen months ago.

Your personal Full Moon Celebration invitation. It’s live!
Yes, we’re about to hold out second, online, live, Full Moon Ceremony online, and you’re invited, and at home during lockdown you can participate and join in the liturgy, or just let it ‘sink’ deep, either ‘live’ or as a recording.

Live Full Moon Ceremony ‘Broadcast’ via FaceBook
Friday, 5 June 2020 at 8pm (UK Time)
Join us! 

So, first: To see  the broadcast and join in you need to be a FaceBook friend of mine. If you’ve been able to see my morning ‘Thought For The Day’ broadcasts via FaceBook then you’re good to go.

If you’re new, not a current FaceBook friend do check here. If don’t see previous videos there  or if you can’t gain full access to that webpage then you’ll need to become a  FaceBook friend: press the ‘friends’ link on my Facebook site, I’ll accept as soon as I can, and then do try the link above again to see if you can gain access, in readiness for the ‘broadcast’. If you still can’t get access, or if there’s any ‘challenges’, please email me, at: tadhgtemp@googlemail.com.

Second: You can watch the broadcast and take it ‘in’ as a form of meditation, and that would be good. But, to fully participate, why not go to last month’s article and download or print out the liturgy so you can follow, and recite parts in response, and fully participate. The Full Moon Ceremony liturgy can be found here.

So, I hope to ‘see’ you at our second Full Moon Ceremony. Come and participate! Some new material and music added!

Meanwhile, wishing you and yours the blessings of the Moon-Giver at the time, Tadhg

 

Ephemera: The Bright Moon: Full Moon

20190516 EPHEMERA THE BRIGHT MOON 18 MAY 2019

There’s a full moon soon, and you know how I love full moon’s, and use these events for some kind of ritual and/or celebration.

The next full moon is this Saturday, 18 May 2019, rising around sunset from a UK vantage point, above the head of the constellation of Scorpio.

To some this full Moon is known as the Milk Moon or Planting Moon. To those of Medieval England and Wicca it was/is known as the Hare Moon. Whilst Celts and many Druids Of yesterday and today know it as the Bright Moon.

The Moon is most happy
When it is full.
[Hafiz]

And, as we head towards a full moon, here’s an opportunity to look at the physical moon in awe from a scientific point of view; to marvel at it from a deeply spiritual point of view, too; and to think about how to celebrate this wonderful event.

The Physical Moon
Did you know: The Moon is shrinking! Yes, as its interior cools, a new NASA study suggests that the change is shrinking, and as it does it triggers moonquakes.

Nasa said only a few days ago that the Moon is about 150 feet (50 meters) smaller than it was – though this shrinking has taken place over the the last several hundred million years or so. So, you won’t see it shrink, but its enough for any brittle fissures on the Moon to collapse and cause the Moon’s surface to rumble.

The ‘Magical’ Moon
But, the Moon is more than just a rocky satellite to the Earth. As you gaze up at the full Moon, and see that eternal face smiling down, the Moon does hold a certain romantic charm, some would say ‘magic’.

The moon is the reflection of your heart
and moonlight is the twinkle of your love.
[Debasish Mridha]

Whenever I can I like to celebrate the time of the full Moon. Sometimes it’s just a case of going for a silent walk, even in the city, to ‘bathe’ in its light. Sometimes it’s just lifting up a nice glass of red or white and drinking to its glory, or meditating on the Moon-Giver.

Full Moon ‘Releasing’ Ritual
Sometimes, there is a ‘releasing’ ritual I like to do at this time – to release me from all that is holding me back. Full Moon’s are a great time to start new projects and rekindle intentionality. You might like to try the following, too.

The moon looks upon many night flowers;
the night flowers see but one moon.
[Jean Ingelow]

As with any ritual, it is an outward sign and activity of an inward occurrence. It can be done outdoors on the night of the full moon, but equally, it can be done indoors, and it can be adjusted to make it even more meaningful to you.

So, find a quiet place, and:

1. Light a candle (to denote entering into sacred space/sacred time). If you want, you can place crystals, power-rocks and other positive-tools around you. On occasions I’ve opened the Bible to the place where it mentions the Moon and Sun. Opening a book, sacred to yourself is one way of making this a special occasion, and declaring that you’ve entered sacred space and sacred time.

2. De-clutter your mind of thoughts, clear your energy. This can be done by imagination, and so why not close your eyes, and visualise that you are standing under a silver waterfall that cascades down from the Moon. As you so do, in your mind’s eye, imagine that all negativity being washed away.

3. Take a few deep breaths to ‘center’ yourself, to move deeply within your being, and then ‘ask’ what it is that you wish to be released from. What is it that is holding you back? What is your limiting belief? What no longer serves a positive purpose in your life. In your mind’s eye, write it on a piece of paper. Wait for a short while.

4. As you breathe in, think of that piece of paper with that limiting belief written on it, and as you breathe out, imagine that that piece of paper moves into the candle and is burnt up. It no longer exists. Do this several times. [Remember, this is all taking place in your imagination, so please don’t use that physical candle and actually set fire to anything you have with you!].

This type of breathing in/out with visualisation is like tonglen, in reverse.

5. After a short while open your eyes, fully enter this ‘realm’ by gazing gently at the candle for a few minutes. There is no rush. And then, to denote a closing of that sacred space/sacred time, blow the candle out and/or close any sacred book. Wait for a few minutes. Doing things slowly, here, is good. To ‘ground’ yourself completely you might like to walk around just for a few seconds.

6. Ofcourse, this is a ritual, an outward sign or action of an inward occurrence, and you will still need to ‘do’ the necessary things in the physical realm to bring about a releasing of what is/was holding you back, to ‘earth it’, and to work towards a positive outcome.

7. You might like to keep a journal of your experiences in that ritual, what you ‘released’ and what you intend to do to ‘earth it’ and work towards releasing negativity, and what you’ll do in working towards positivity, detailing actions and how you felt at the time. It’s always good to look back, weeks, months or even years later.

Poem
Sometime ago I wrote a poem about Arianrhod, the personification of the Moon. You might use it as a mediation as you gaze at the upcoming new Moon, or as part of a more formal liturgy or ritual you might perform in honour of the Moon and/or the Moon giver.

To read the poem ‘Arianrhod in all her splendour ‘, please click [here].

And finally…
At this time of the full Moon, much light and love to you and those whom you love, Tadhg.

‘I arise today through the strength of heaven, light of sun, Radiance of moon, Splendor of fire, Speed of lightning, Swiftness of wind, Depth of sea, Stability of earth, Firmness of rock.’
[John O’Donohue,]

 

[The header photo for this article is copyright protected, 2019 by Pennie Ley, and is used with permission. Kind regards to Pennie]

 

 

Full Moon: The Singing Moon & More: Ephemera

20180923 EPHEMERA THE SINGING MOON 25 SEPTEMBER 2018

In a society of ‘mechanical time’, where the emphasis is on greater productivity and acquisition, there are a few discerning people, and that includes you, who are aware of nature’s cycles and their deep meaning, and who really celebrate life and the turning of the Circle, and who ‘see’ beyond the surface level.

There is a realm we can encounter that is beyond, where rationality may not ‘rule’ but which is not irrational, but ‘arational’. Above. Beyond. It is there that we can meet, and appreciate that which is beyond, and full Moon’s are wonderfully liminal events and times

‘In the depth of my soul there is a wordless song.’ Khalil Gibran

For you, here’s some vital information, information for all Celts, Druids and others about the upcoming full moon and another astronomical sight to see a little later on, and a story about the Moon and Sun. You know I like stories and ancient myth, and this one doesn’t disappoint. It’s time to pause and consider deeply.

‘Observe how the lilies of the field grow; they do not toil nor do they spin, yet I say to you that not even Solomon in all his glory clothed himself like one of these.’ Matthew 6:28a-29, The Book

FULL MOON DETAILS
The next full moon takes place on 25 September 2018 at 2.52 UTC, and so it will look (almost) full on the evening of Monday, 24 September and Tuesday, 25 September 2018, and viewable  in the south-eastern sky (from a UK aspect). It’s time to celebrate.

’There are nights when the wolves are silent and only the moon howls.’ George Carlin

Some call this full moon the the (Full) Corn Moon or Harvest Moon. The term ‘Harvest Moon’ refers to the Full Moon that occurs closest to the Autumnal Equinox. Others call it the Barley Moon, the Fruit Moon, or to some Druids and Celts, such as myself, it’s called the Singing Moon.

MYTHICAL STORY ABOUT THE MOON AND SUN
You know I love stories, and here’s an ancient myth from the Philippines about the Moon and the Sun.

At the very beginning of time the Sun and the Moon were married, and they had many children. These were the bright stars you see in the night sky. Now, the Sun was very fond of his children, but whenever he tried to embrace any of them, he was so hot that he burned them up. This made the Moon very angry, so angry infact she finally forbade him to touch them again, and he was greatly grieved.

One day the Moon went down to the spring, as usual, to do some washing, but before she left she told the Sun that he must not touch any of their children in her absence. When she returned, however, she found that he had disobeyed her, and that several of the children had, sadly, perished.

She was very angry, and picked up a banana tree to strike him. He retaliated by throwing sand at her, and some landed on her face, and to this day you can see the dark marks of sand on the face of the Moon.

Their argument got worse and the the Sun started to chase the Moon. And, now they have been arguing and chasing each other ever since. Sometimes he gets so near that he almost catches her, but she escapes, and so the chase goes on.

ANOTHER ASTRONOMICAL SIGHT
For the astronomically-minded, or for those who like to look upward and gaze at the stars, the end of the month is significant. On 29 September the Moon will be quite close to the bright star Aldebaran. If you look at the Moon, and hold one arm out, and form a fist but with three fingers extended as if giving some kind of (arms-length) scout salute (each finger then being about 1.5 degrees), that’s the perceived gap between the Moon and Aldebaran.

’May you touch dragonflies and stars, dance with fairies and talk to the moon…’ Unknown

Aldebaran appears about 5 degrees away from the Moon, and is an orange giant star some sixty-five light years from us, situated in the constellation of Taurus. The space exploration probe Pioneer 10 which left the solar system is headed in the direction of that star, and should have a (relatively) close encounter in about two million years.

In Hindu astronomy Aldebaran is called Rohini, ‘the red one’ and is thought to be the wife of the god Chandra (which is the Moon); in Bengali it is called Stacidan because of its orange colour; and to the ancient Greeks it was known as Lampadias, ‘the torch-bearer’. As regards the Greeks, it was recorded that that star was occulted (covered (just)) by the Moon on 11 March AD509.

’The moon is the reflection of your heart and moonlight is the twinkle of your love.’ Debasish Mridha

As well as featuring in ancient myth, references to Aldebaran have featured in Star Trek, Far From the Madding Crowd, Ulysses, Lord of the Rings, and in a Rolling Stones song.

CELEBRATION
You may want to celebrate this full moon. I’d heartily recommended it as a way of marking time, pausing to put things into perspective, and to celebrate the circle of the moon and nature, and to ponder upon The One Behind It All.

In many ways the best way to celebrate and/or give thanks is to go out and gaze in awe and appreciate the wonder of that full Moon, and the Source of All, in the stillness of the night. But, in addition, you might like to:

  • say a few words of gratitude out loud or to yourself for the bounty of this year’s food, harvest,  the simple things in life, for personal prosperity or health, or incorporate it in a ritual that you might do periodically, and maybe drink a celebratory drink as you gaze in awe, or
  • remember a loved one who has passed-on, and bless them, and remember good things about them as you look up, or
  • send up good-thoughts or a prayer about an upcoming event or for someone known to you that might need energy or healing, expecting the Source of All to hear and respond.

’Tell me the story…about how the sun loved the moon so much, that she died every night…Just to let him breathe…’ Hanako Ishii

Be blessed, Tadhg.

 

[With gratitude to Pennie Ley (FaceBook Link) for the kind use of the Moon photograph header, above. Copyrighted. All rights reserved, Pennie Ley, 2018].

And The Moon Steps Lower…: Ephemera: 26 August 2018 Full Moon

20180822 EPHEMERA AND THE MOON STEPS LOWER 26 AUGUST 2018

Yes, it’s nearly the time of the next full Moon. Infact, this Sunday, 26 August 2018 sees the next full moon, rising above the horizon (from a UK perspective) at about 8.22pm and reaching its highest point in the sky early on Sunday morning (at about 2am). Looking south, it will be in the constellation of Aquarius, the Water Bearer.

And the moon steps lower,
quietly changing
her luminous masks, brushing
everything as she passes
with her slow hands
and soft lips…

(Harvest Moon by Mary Oliver)

This full Moon swings to the south of the antisolar point, and so it is south of the Earth’s shadow, so there is no eclipse (partial or total) of the full moon. In fact, all the full Moons for the rest of 2018 dip south of the antisolar point and ‘beneath’ the Earth’s shadow. For the technically-minded this full Moon (month/cycle) is designated as Lunation number 1183 (that is, 1183 new Moons since Professor Ernest W Brown started counting new Moons, beginning with the new Moon of 17 January 1923).

‘She used to tell me that a full Moon was when mysterious things happen and wishes come true’. Shannon A Thompson.

To ancient cultures, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Hebrew, Druid and others the Moon was significant in their calendar, farming, rituals, daily life etc.

To some, this full moon is known as the Fruit Moon, the Women’s Moon, the Sturgeon Moon, the Corn Moon, and to some, especially (ancient and latter-day) Celts, to myself and others, it is the Dispute Moon. The reason for it to be called the Dispute Moon is many and varied, and may simply be so because, as autumn and winter approaches, one’s survival centred on the good-will of others, and the upcoming months wasn’t a time when disputes should be continued. Survival might have depended on keeping ‘short accounts’ and getting along with one’s neighbours.

‘Sometimes the night can be your best therapist. For the Moon is free, and always there to listen’. A Y Greyson

Ah, the Moon. There is an ancient Celtic story that Cerridwen, the Welsh muse or goddess of inspiration, mentioned in the Black Book of Carmarthen, is a personification of the Moon. True, there are stories of Cerridwen in daily life, living near lake Bala (and having stayed at Bala I can highly recommend that area of Wales) and giving birth to a son and a daughter, Sadly, it is said that her son, Morfan (also called Afagddu) was ugly and so she compensated by making him wise by using magic. But, these things never run to plan.

There is also a view that, alternately, or perhaps as well as having an earthy life, Cerridwen was the Moon personified. Her name, from Welsh to English can be interpreted (depending on how you divide her name) as being ‘fair’ and ‘loved’, or ‘crooked white one’. The latter, I hold dear, as it does sum up the bright crescent moon hanging in the sky, appearing stooped or crooked. And, doesn’t the Moon inspire? Dear Cerridwen.

As you gaze up at the full Moon, do pause and meditate and make this full Moon (and/or new Moons) an important part of your life, and, say a word or a prayer, raise a toast or offer a libation to the One who inspires us all. The Moon-maker. The One Behind It All. The inspirer.

‘What was most significant about the lunar voyage was not that men set foot on the moon, but that they set eye on the Earth’. Norman Cousins

No information about the moon would be complete without the amazing announcement, in the last day or so, of finding water at the polar regions of the Moon.

Back in 2008/9 India’s first Moon probe, Chandrayaan 1, with a Moon mapping instrument on board from NASA, orbited the Moon for about a year, and returned valuable data. That data, in a new study led by Shuai Li of the University of Hawaii and Brown University, was reviewed and showed a distinctive ‘signature’ which, they say, can only be water ice.

That find may not herald life on the Moon, but it may make mankind’s future exploration of the Moon and of space, our journey to the stars, easier. An amazing find.

‘The Moon is our local port opening to the universe; in the future, it’s through that port we will sail our ships to the coastless oceans’. Mehmet Murat Ildan

 

Ephemera: The Bright Moon [Full Moon, 29 May 2018]

20180524 EPHEMERA FULL MOON 29 MAY 2018Another full moon approaches, and so we have another opportunity to meditate as we gaze upward to the ‘silver penny’ that smiles down upon us, or extend gratitude, or pause for thought, or go for a walk looking at our moon-shadow.

Full moon. Time to stop.

It’s time to celebrate the wonderful satellite that guides the Earth’s seasons and weather, controls its oceans and tides, that makes life possible on this blue planet, and when one thinks of the Source behind it all, it has a deeply, deeply spiritual dimension.

’The moon is beautiful only when the mind is seeking beauty and the heart is loving.’ Debasish Mridh

Many ancient cultures measured time using the moon and its phases. For instance, to the ancient Hebrew tribes Rosh Chodesh, celebrating the new moon, was an awesome event though its observance waned over the centuries, despite clues to the event in the Torah. And, ofcourse in the West our calendar is still dominated by irregular months imposed by Roman emperors of yesteryear for political and egotistical reasons, rather than for religious or spiritual reasons.

It’s time to reclaim the spiritual.

And, with the spiritual side of the full moon is mind, and although written for the new moon, the following, might be useful as a form of liturgy at this time:

‘Praised be to the moon
as she rises tonight:
a round white pearl
in the velvet earlobe of the world.

Praised be to her light
that fills my empty teacup,
and across the jagged city
strokes your sleeping cheek
as you reach through your dreams…’

Lesléa Newman, part of her contribution to Celebrating The New Moon, edited by Susan Berrin. In the liturgy/poem above the last two lines could be amended to read ‘Strokes my/our sleeping cheek, as you reach through my/our dreams.’

So, this month’s full Moon falls on Tuesday, 29 May 2018 (at 14.19 GMT/UTC) from a UK aspect.

While the moon is officially at its fullest during the day, the rising satellite will provide fine views by night-time, though it may be low in the sky, rising at 9.48pm (from the UK aspect).

The May Full Moon is known by some as the Full Flower or Big Leaf Moon. In medieval England it would have been called the Hare Moon and later on the Milk Moon. Others call it the Grass Moon, and I and a number of latter-day Celts (and others) know it as the Bright Moon. Perhaps you have a special name for this month’s full moon?

’We are all like the bright moon, we still have our darker side’. Kahlil Gibran

The full moon, having a tendency to be so bright that it ‘drowns out’ stars and planets, will, nevertheless share the sky with some of the planets that are visible to the naked eye, such as the planet Venus in the western sky. Those in the Southern Hemisphere will also get views of Venus on that night, though Venus will be lower in the sky.

For the astronomically minded, the moon will be near the cusp of the constellations of Libra and Scorpio, and near the bright, red supergiant star, Antares, some 550 light years away. With its reddish appearance that star can look very much like the planet Mars. Hence, its traditional name Antares which is derived from the Ancient Greek meaning ‘rival to-Ares’ (‘opponent to-Mars’ or ‘ant(i) Ares’).

’May you touch dragonflies and stars, dance with fairies and talk to the moon…’ Unknown

And, for those whose gardening is governed by moon folklore and/or are interested in the rural ways of yesteryear (especially, but not only of Welsh folklore), tt is generally reckoned that lettuce, spinach, grass, cabbage, cress and any leafy plant will thrive if planted now, as energy at this time goes to the leaves.

So, how will you celebrate this wonderful event?

However you mark this event, I ask for the Source of All to bless you and yours at the time of this full moon, Tadhg.

 
[Many thanks to Pennie Ley for the use of the moon ‘header’ photo above. Copyrighted]