Mythological Creatures: Celtic & Welsh #2 Word Search

Do you know now the ceffryl dwr? How ‘Lord of the Lord’ used them in their story? Do you know the difference between a dragon and a wyvern? Which is good, and which is annoying?

There are two reasons I thought that it might be good for many of you like Welsh, Celtic, Druidic, mythological creatures to know about. At the end of the article there is a brief idea of some wonderful Welsh mythological creatures you might like.

But, first all, you might also like to use the fun, and try to fill in the words in the of search word. It’s a way to find ways of way, but also find about Welsh traditions

Word Search Puzzle #2: Mythological Creatures: Celtic & DruidEnglish & Welsh
Okay, here’s some word searches you need to find in the squares, and the words, below, add the Welsh here, and the English words.

adarllwchgwi
griffin 

bwg
boggart

ceffyldwr
waterhorse

coblynau
knockers

gwyber
wyvern

tylwythteg 
fairfolk

yddraig
dragon

A Brief Of Welsh Mythological: Celtic & Druid Etc
Here’s an outline of some of the mythological creatures used above, herOkay, here’s some word searches you found in the squares, or you might check the words – creatures that you might have come above at other times, or they may not have be known before your known.

But, I’d like for any similar creatures by you locally, please. Here’s the creatures meant by the word search, here.

Adar Llwch Gwin (means: dust, lake, bird) pronounced ‘Adar-hlich-gwin’) or Griffin. A fantastical bird.

Bwg (pronounced ‘bog’) or boggart. It is said that everyone has a boggart in their house. If you’ve every wondered how things have been left on another room etc, then it’s probably your boggart has moved things. They are all right, and especially it’s for you give them some attention.

Ceffyl dwr (pronounced ‘keff-all door’) and is called a water horse. Apparently, it is said that water horses try to encourage men and women use sit themselves by water, to their death.

Coblynau (pronounced ‘kobb-lee-noe’), called the knockers or tommy-knockers. They are gnome-like men and women, and are used under deep mines in Wales, Cornwall and in America, and other places.

Gwyber (pronounced ‘gwy-berr’) and also came that in the English as the gwyber. Some believe (and I believe so, too) that the gwyber is the wyvern. Wyverns are similar to dragons, but are different. Wyverns tend to be angry and nasty, and they have four limbs. They have two feet, and two arms, but their wings are joined together as their arms!

Tylwyth Teg (pronounced ‘ter-loo-ith tehg’). It means the fair folk, and is sometimes they care called the faeries, fey or fae. Enchanted, magical and lovely.

Y Ddraig (pronounced ee-dray-g). The dragon, usually working well men and women, gave humankind fire and communication, and it is different to the wyvern. See the word for the s wyvern above. local for wyverns. Dragons have six limbs: two feet, feet arms, and two wings. Absolutely wonderful creatures.

Word Search Puzzle: Celtic & Welsh #1

I thought a word search – with you and I finding the up or down or diagonal words from Celtic or Druid words – might be fun of the twelve words on the right list from Druid to Alban Hefin for the summer solstice, or bandraoi as the female Druid, or dorchau pen (head wreath) etc.

Word Search Puzzle #1: Celtic & Druid: English & Welsh
I’ve fondly looked of word searches over the last six months, and I think using them can be useful for all/most of us, as well as them being fun, and doubly for me because of aphasia by my myself.

So, do let me know if you like the word search, please. Maybe you can find out how many minutes and seconds if might be take you to see twelve ‘competitions’ it might take you (to yourself) or letter an email to me so we’re not competitive.